Philadelphia, PA Steel Plant Accident, Apr 1911

MOLTEN STEEL SPLASHES UPON SCORE OF MEN.

CRUCIBLE OF LIQUID METAL IS FATAL TO FIVE WORKMEN.

PLUG OF POTS OPENS BURNING ATTENDANTS WHO LET GO THEIR HOLD.

KETTLE TIPS -- MEN TAKEN TO HOSPITAL SUFFERING UNTOLD AGONY.

Philadelphia, April 15. -- Five workmen were killed, two are fatally injured, 12 others seriously hurt at the Midvale steel works at Mayne Junction this afternoon when a huge contained filled with molten steel gave way, the firey liquid pouring or splashing over more than a score of the employes.

Plug Burned Out.
The accident occurred in what is known as open hearth No. 1. Several tons of the molten steel had been poured into a huge container and it was being slowly propelled along a traveling crane across the shop to waiting molds. More than twenty men were under and around it guilding the huge vessel with long tongs, when, without warning, a plug in the bottom of the container burnt out and the molten steel instantly began pouring through the hole. It splutered and splashed over some of the men and they were compelled to let go of the hold.

Kettle Turns Over.
In thus releasing their holds, the huge kettle became unsteady and in the next instant it tumbled over and poured down a solid stream of the molten steel. Seven of the workmen were caught almost directly under the full flood of the fiery stuff but all except one, JAMES TOBIN, managed to get from under the container. TOBIN dropped in his tracks and was burned to a crisp.

Assistance Hurried.
The big whistle of the Midvale works brought prompt assistance and those who were not seriously burned were treated in the emergency hospital within the works while ambulances rushed the others to Germantown hospital. A quick examination showed the physician that nothing could save six of the men and four of them died within a short time of one another tonight.

Condition Terrible.
The physicians say there is no hope for Superintendent GEORGE F. STEEL and PATRICK CUMMINGHAM. All the victims taken to the hospital were in a terrible condition. Their clothing was burned and in taking it off patches of skin and flesh came with it.
GEORGE F. STEEL, the superintendent of the shop, died at 11:50 p.m.

Eau Claire Leader Wisconsin 1911-04-16