Bradford, PA Propjet Crashes Short Of Runway, Dec 1968

20 KILLED IN PLANE CRASH NEAR BRADFORD.

ALLEGHENY PROPJET SLAMS INTO MARSHY AREA SHORT OF RUNWAY.

Bradford, Pa. (AP) -- Holiday joy turned to tragedy Christmas Day for families faced with the grim task of identifying the bodies of 20 relatives killed in an airliner crash that injured 27 others.
The twin-engine Allegheny Airlines Convair 580, a propjet flying from Detroit to Washington, was making what airline spokesmen said was a routine landing approach to Bradford Regional Airport in a light snowfall Tuesday night when it slammed into a marshy area about three miles short of the runway.
Rescue teams labored through deep snow and driving squalls to reach the crumpled plane. The injured were rushed to hospitals in Bradford and Kane. At least one was in serious condition, the others fair to satisfactory.
Airline arranged a special flight from Eastern Pennsylvania and flew in relatives of many of the plane's passengers to this town near the New York border.
Grim-faced, they walked into a gayly decorated Bradfore motel where the airline established a crash headquarters.
The bodies of the dead, meantime, were being held at a makeshift morgue in a fire hall, at the little town of Cyclone near the airport.
The plane, Allegheny flight 736, had left Detroit and landed at Erie, Pa., before heading for Bradford. It had been scheduled to go on to Harrisburg, Pa., before flying on to the nation's capital.
When it crashed, the plane was carrying a crew of three and 44 passengers, three of whom were Allegheny employes.
The pilot, Capt. GARY L. MULL of Fairfax, Va., and first officer RICHARD B. GARDNER of Springfield, VA., were killed.
Hostess RITA BOYLEN, 23, of Alexandria, Va., survived.
An airline spokesman said the crew contacted Bradford Airport by radio shortly before the crash and gave no sign of trouble.
The plane clipped the tops off some small trees on the edge of a frozen marsh, skidded along the ground for about a quarter mile, then spun around and flipped over on its back.
The impact sheared off the wings, leaving only stubs and cracked open the fuselage in the wing area.
A survivor, GREGORY TOIN, 42, of Pottsville, Pa., said the passengers had no warning.
"We were instructed to fasten our seat belts in preparation for a landing at Bradford," he said, "and it seemed as if we were headed for the runway in a normal fashion."
"Then we crashed in what seemed to be a gully near a dirt road. I was knocked out for a time, and when I regained consciousness I started to kick out a window and couldn't. Then I saw there was a large split in the fuselage above me, so I crawled out of it."
RON VAN PELT, 26, of Plymouth, Mich., built a bonfire out of debris to keep himself and the other survivors warm. The flames were seen from the air by the crew of another Allegheny Airlines plane who radioed the location to the airport tower.
Firemen and other volunteers jumped into ambulances, trucks, jeeps and snowmobiles and rode through heavy snow and 10 degree temperatures to the crash site.
A 10-man team from the National Transportation Safety Board arrived at the crash site early Christmas Day and said they found the plane's cockpit voice recorder and a flight recorder in good condition.
The devices record all conversation between pilot and co-pilot and other information, such as speed and altitude, that are vital to investigators trying to find out what caused the crash.
NAMES OF DEAD RELEASED.
Washington (AP) -- Allegheny Airlines listed 20 persons Wednesday as having lost their lives in the crash of a Convair prop-jet at Bradford, Pa.
Hometowns of the victims were not available, the airline said.
The dead:
MISS ROBIN PORTER, flying from Detroit to Harrisburg.
MISS E. LUTZ, Detroit to Harrisburg.
MISS CHRIS FARLOW, Detroit to Harrisburg.
W. W. DAY, Detroit to Harrisburg.
H. WALZE, Detroit to Harrisburg.
JOSEPH KING, Detroit to Harrisburg.
ARTHUR SINCLAIR, Detroit to Harrisburg.
W. O'CONNOR, Detroit to Harrisburg.
MRS. W. O'CONNOR, Detroit to Harrisburg.
DR. JOHN BOYD, Erie to Harrisburg.
J. STAMBAUGH, Erie to Harrisburg.
MRS. J. STAMBAUGH, Erie to Harrisburg.
MISS ANGEL, Erie to Harrisburg.
MISS VERA CIANELLA, Erie to Washington.
JAN UHLER, Erie to Harrisburg.
C. BAUER, Detroit to Bradford.
Capt. GARY L. MULL, Pilot.
First Officer RICHARD B. GARDNER, Co-pilot.
First Officer LOWELL MILLER, Detroit to Washington.

The Derrick Oil City Pennsylvania 1968-12-26

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JOY OF HOLIDAY ENDS IN CRASH OF AIRLINER.

20 KILLED, 27 INJURED.

Bradford, Pa. (AP) -- A young woman coming home to spend the holidays with her parents. A salesman returning from a business trip for a reunion with his children. Two members of a family of four going to meet relatives on the other side of Pennsylvania.
These are some of the 20 people killed when Allegheny Airlines Flight No. 736 struck a mountain on Christmas Eve. Twenty-seven others were injured.
AN ONLY CHILD.
CHRISTINE FARLOW, 20, an only child left her parent's house in Copeland, Pa., nearly a year ago to take an office job with Allegheny Airlines in Detroit, Mich. She was coming home for Christmas. MR. and MRS. HOWARD FARLOW were waiting for her at the Harrisburg Airport.
She never met them. CHRISTINE was killed when the twin-engine prop-jet crashed while approaching Bradford Regional Airport, a stop away from the reunion. It slammed into an icy marsh midway up the mountain and overturned.
BONFIRE FOR WARMTH.
Volunteers in ambulances, trucks, jeeps and snowmobiles rushed to the downed craft. One of the survivors RON VAN PELT, 26, of Camp Hill, Pa., started a bonfire to keep himself and the others warm in the 10 degree temperature and its light helped guide the rescuers.
Waiting in Camp Hill, Pa., for JOSEPH KING, were his wife and four of his five children. The fifth, 17-year-old CHRISTINE KING, was riding in the plane with him.
The three older KING children, a relative said, arrived earlier from Michigan and Detroit for a Christmas gathering.
KING, a 52-year-old sales manager for a carpet company was killed in the crash. His daughter was injured and taken to Bradford Hospital.
LEWIS C. ANGEL, JR., 44, and his son, LEWIS C. ANGEL III, 21, were in the same room Wednesday at Bradford Hospital. The bodies of ANGEL'S wife and daughter were resting in the same funeral home 30 miles away in Kane, Pa.
INVESTIGATION PUSHED.
An investigating team of 35 men started its probe of the crash of the Convair 580. The flight orginated in Detroit and was scheduled to end in Washington.
"At this point in the investigation, all we're doing is collecting facts," said Russell J. Abbott, air safety director for the National Transportation Safety Board.
The lucky 27 who survived the crash have started checking out of hospitals.
"This was the biggest Christmas present I ever had," said TERRIE GROSS, 20, ignoring her frostbitten feet, cut legs and badly bruised forehead. "I'm alive."

The Moberly Monitor-Index Missouri 1968-12-26

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The following is from the New Castle News Pennsylvania 1968-12-26

Listing of the Survivors Of the Allegheny Airlines Crash at Bradford, Pa.
C. DIZIO, no address.
T. HAVERSTOCK, Harrisburg, Pa.
GREGORY TOBIN, Pottsville, Pa.
HAROLD E. SMITH, Warren, Mich.
MRS. ELISA SLAVBODA, Detroit.
MRS. TERRY GROSS, Detroit.
MRS. JANICE WALZE, Wayne, Mich.
ERIN WALZE, an infant, Wayne, Mich.
MRS. C. KING, Detroit.
R. VAN PELT, Harrisburg, Pa.
ROBERT ANGEL, Erie, Pa.
LEWIS ANGEL, Robert's father, Erie, Pa.
BILLY GOODMOTE, Los Angeles, Calif.
TOMMY GOODMOTE, Billy's brother, Los Angeles, Calif.
DR. F. DANKMEYER, Rochester, Minn.
MISS SUSAN WYAND, Erie, Pa.
MISS S. GARTNER, Erie, Pa.
MISS BRENDA BYRD, Willoughby, Ohio.
MRS. JANE BYRD, Willoughby, Ohio.
MISS BETTY BYRD, Willoughby, Ohio.
MR. J. BRENNAN, Harrisburg, Pa.
MISS R. ZIMMERMAN, Harrisburg, Pa.
MR. R. BROWN, Lebanon, Pa.
MR. R. NASADOS, Mt. Carmel, Pa.
Capt. NEVIN REMALLY, an off-duty Allegheny pilot returning to home base in Washington.
RITA BOYLAN, a hostess who was on duty, based in Washington.
REBA FRIEDRICH, an off-duty Allegheny hostess returning to home base in Washington.

Comments

This is very interesting and

This is very interesting and fantastic to read about...

Bradford crash rescue effort

My father, Stanley L. Homan, was one of the West Side Fire Department, Kane PA, firemen who went out to help in the rescue operation at this and the later Bradford air crash disasters. He was out most of the night, and he would rarely talk about the experience, except to say that it was a terrible time. He was also very upset by the insensitive behaviour of some members of the public who came almost as sight-seers, impeding the rescue work.

Response

Kristen
Thank you so very much. It is wonderful to hear my transcription reached out to you in a special way.
Blessings always
Stu

updating my email address

New email address is: [email protected] Phone # is still the same.

It IS because of THIS site, Stu Beitler, that united me with the men who rescued me & many other rescuers who I met, in person, in July 2009 in Bradford, Pa. Yes, I went back. Yes, I went to the crash site. Yes, I got to connect with a few survivors & family members of.
Thank YOU, Stu, for your site .You, chamged the course of my life by posting the Allegheny 736 crash in Bradford, Pa.

Allegheny flight 736

I am one of the survivors of Allegheny 736. Listed as Terrie (or Terry) Gross in most of the newspaper articles, my current and maiden name is Terrie Morrison.

I was one of the very most furtunate on the flight, my injuries were minor, although I was hospitalized for 10 days afterwards mostly due to the frostbite I sustained, having lost my shoes at some point in time, while walking on the marshy ice outside the fuselage waiting for the rescue teams.

In 1968 I was 20 years old, working as a Secretary at the U. of Michigan, and had to work that day; and taking Allegheny 736 from Detroit to Harrisburg was the only way I would be able to get "home" (York, Pa) in time to spend Christmas with my family. From Detroit to Erie I had an aisle seat in the front of the aircraft. When we landed in Erie and some passengers deplaned, I wanted to find a window seat so I would be able to see the Christmas lights below on the remainder of our journey. As this was long before the days of "assigned seating" I was able to get up and choose a window seat, the first available one being further back, just behind the wing on the left side of the cabin. Had it not been for that single decision to move, I would have been with those in the front, who perished.

I remember looking out the window and seeing the heavy snowfall outside the window as we seemed to be on an otherwise normal approach into Bradford. I remember the first sudden abnormal jolt, and I thought perhaps we had blown a tire upon landing. I remember lowering my head into a tucked position, and I remember offering a short prayer. Then I remember it being suddenly pitch black dark, and quiet. When the aircraft stopped its momentum, we were inverted and I remember hanging upside down from my seatbelt. I knew something had gone very wrong but I had no idea of the magnitude. I remember silently saying to myself, "stay calm, stay calm, and you'll be ok." I reached to my right to ask the young lady who had been seated next to me, if she was ok; nothing was there; her seat had dislodged from its anchor.

My seat was immediately behind the left wing. I looked down and saw a gaping hole in the side of the fuselage, and then I saw a pair of men's boots and a gentleman calling out to us. I believe he was the passenger seated in the row in front of me, who had been the first to escape from the hole. I unhooked my seatbelt and fell to the ground. I called out to man and he reached in and helped me to crawl through the hole.

Once outside the aircraft I knew I would survive. I saw many others with varying degrees of injuries. Some were in shock. One or two of the men seemed to take charge of attempting to keep us organized. The bon fire was built. It was still pitch black and I still had no concept of how serious the crash had been, or that there were fatalities. I looked around for nearby lights or sounds of the airport, and there was nothing. I thought of my family, waiting for me in Harrisburg, and I wondered what they had been told, and what they must have been thinking.

The concept of time disappeared. Only by reading later versions of the event did I realize how much time passed, before I saw the headlights of oncoming rescue vehicles. I began walking toward the lights of the emergency vehicles in the distance. I would have run, but the icy marshy ground below my feet made even walking difficult and cumbersome. Upon reaching the first ambulance, a gentleman helped me inside. I believe he was an Allegheny Airways employee who had been working at the airport. I remember he took off the socks he was wearing and put them on my bleeding, frostbitten feet. I remember there was a dog in the front seat of the ambulance, and the driver, and I hugged the dog to get warm.

In the emergency room I was triaged and my injuries were not life threatening. I was admitted to a hospital room. About midnight a pastor, I believe a Lutheran pastor, came to my room and asked if he could do anything for me. I asked if he could make contact with my family, still waiting at the Harrisburg airport, to let them know that I was ok. He came back a short time later and told me he had successfully reached my father with my message. I believe at that time, I went into some degree of shock because I don't recall much after that, until the next day, Christmas Day, my mother arrived at the hospital, having been flown there that morning from Harrisburg on Allegheny's flight for family members. She brought with her a small red candle Christmas tree, about 8" in height, because she wanted me to have a tree for Christmas. I still have it.

I was fortunate that one of the doctor's in Bradford Hospital was experienced in the treatment of frostbite. I remained in the hospital there for about a week, and was then released to a hospital in my hometown of York, Pa for several more days.

I think of my fellow passengers quite frequently, and always at Christmastime. I know how fortunate I was to survive. I know how fragile life is, and how it can be taken away in an instant, and how a seemingly simple decision, like what seat to choose, can be the difference between living or not living. I grieve for those who lost family members that night, and for those who survived but sustained disabilities or injuries that remain with them after all these years. I know that could have been my fate, had I simply been in a different seat.

It's been 48 years since 12/24/68. The memories I have of that night are clear in my mind. I hope that the experience shaped me into being a person of greater faith. While waiting for our rescuers, I prayed and asked God, if He would help me get out of this situation alive, I would commit to living the life He would want me to live. I try to live up to that commitment today.

Cousin lost her life

My second cousin, Cindy Stambaugh, lost her life in this crash, along with her husband Jeff. I was in their wedding when I was five years old.

My Brother Louie DiZio was on this flight.

My brother ouie was on this flight on his way home to Ashland PA from Detroit to see his parents for Christmas.
He survied this crash and another passenger told me he was helping other crash victims but he had no memory of doing so.
I guess because of shock? My brother was then hospitalized for 2 weeks for his injuries but eventually recovered.
I don't why his name here is listed as C. Dizio and no address....but to correct this his name is Louie DiZio.

Charles bauer

My two sisters and brother are together this week and talked about this crash. Charles was our first cousin-his father joe was my fathers brother. We remember going to their home that eve to console his wife Helen. We were wondering how you are related? I also worked as a nurse for a few years at Georgetown hospital with Janice walze who became a nurse after the accident. If you would ever like to get in touch I would love to talk with you.

Flight 736 Survivor Miss Betty Byrd

I knew Betty Byrd back in 1971. We attended the same Junior High School in Mentor, Ohio and hung around with the same group of friends at the time. I remember Betty telling me of the plane crash and how she had survived it. Back then, I was young and naïve, the event didn’t have the significance as it holds today. I knew Betty for only a year or so before we lost contact.
Several years ago, as I road on the train that crosses the Knox and Kane Railroad Bridge the train attendant spoke of a plane that crashed in the area on Christmas Eve, 1968. He talked about the rescue efforts the local community made, the weather conditions and how passengers survived the crash. I was intrigued by the story at that time and I remember how it jogged my memory of Betty Byrd. Later, after searching the internet, I was amazed to find that Betty Byrd was on the list of survivors. I believe it was her mother and sister, Jane Byrd and Brenda Byrd that survived as well.
To you Betty,
I hope you are out there somewhere living the wonderful life you certainly deserve. I want you to know that you are in my thoughts and prayers. God bless you and everyone that was on Flight 736.
Sincerely,
Ross Antonio

Flight 736 Survivor Miss Betty Byrd

Several years ago as I road on the train that crosses the Knox and Kane Railroad Bridge the train attendant spoke of a plane that crashed on Christmas Eve, 1968. He talked about the rescue efforts the local community made, the weather conditions and how passengers survived the crash. I was intrigued by the story at that time and I remember how it jogged my memory of Betty Byrd. Later after searching the internet and was amazed to find that Betty Byrd was on the list of survivors. I believe it was her mother and sister, Jane Byrd and Brenda Byrd that survived as well.

I knew Betty Byrd back in 1971. We attended the same Junior High School in Mentor, Ohio and hung around with the same group of friends at the time. I remember Betty telling me of the plane crash and how she survived it. Back then, I was young and naïve, the event didn’t have the significance as it holds today. I knew Betty for only a year or so before we lost contact.

To you Betty,
I hope you are out there somewhere living the wonderful life you certainly deserve. I want you to know that I do think of you. I guess that’s one of the perks of never leaving the community you grew up in. You’re surrounded of constant reminders of your past.
God bless you and everyone that was on Flight 736.

Ross Antonio