McKeesport, PA Train And Wagon Crash, Feb 1899

SIX PERSONS KILLED.

PARTY OF MOVERS MET DEATH ON THE RAILROAD AT McKEESPORT.

STRUCK BY AN ENGINE.

WAGON AND OCCUPANTS HURLED MANY FEET - TWO WERE NOT KILLED OUTRIGHT, BUT SOON DIED.

McKeesport, Feb. 3. - McKeesport was the scene of the most horrifying railroad accident this morning that has ever occurred here. Six people were killed - five men and one woman - by a Baltimore and Ohio train at Riverton Street crossing.
The dead are:
SYLVESTER WILSON.
H. ELDER.
GEORGE DAWSON.
WALTER RUTHERS.
RUSH WILSON.
MRS. MOLLIE SKAUGNESSEY.
The first named four were instantly killed, while RUSH WILSON and MRS. SKAUGNESSEY died in the hospital.
MRS. SKAUGNESSEY sent word that she wanted to have her household goods removed to a house in Duquesne last midnight. At first MR. WILSON did not care to take the job, but later consented. Between 11 and 12 o'clock, assisted by DAWSON, ELDER and RUSH WILSON, he went to the woman's house and packed all her goods on a two-horse wagon. MRS. SKAUGNESSEY concluded to get on the load with them. On the way they met WALTER RUTHERS, from Duquesne, who was on his way home. He jumped on the load to ride over.
When Riverton Street was reached the driver, thinking all was clear or failing to hear an approaching fast freight train on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, did not check the team. Just as the wagon reached the center of the track the engine dashed with full force into it. Like a flash the vehicle, contents and occupants went into the air about ninety feet and were thrown a distance away.
The train was stopped as quickly as possible, the policemen on the beat were called and nearby residents, who heard them, began the work of gathering up the killed and injured and caring for them. SYLVESTER WILSON, WALTER RUTHERS, GEORGE DAWSON and HUDSON ELDER were found to have been instantly killed. MRS. SKAUGNESSEY and RUSH WILSON were unconscious, but terribly injured. DAWSON and ELDER were found about sixty feet from the scene of the accident. The victims were all well known and highly respected.
The train was running at a rate of forty miles an hour, and as the street crossing was near the National Tube Works, it is thought the driver could not hear the approaching train on account of the noise from the mill.

Philadelphia Inquirer Pennsylvania 1899-02-04