Essington, PA Trolly And Oil Truck Collision, Dec 1945

5 KILLED WHEN TROLLEY AND OIL TRUCK COLLIDE.

Philadelphia, Dec. 29. -- (AP) -- At least five persons were killed and seven injured last night in a fire that swept a Philadelphia transportation company trolley car after it was in a collision with an oil-truck in nearby Essington, Pa.
Elmer McCausland, Deputy County Coroner of Delaware County, said none of the dead had been identified. He said police had removed four charred bodies from the wreckage of the trolley and a body they believed to be the truck driver's had been removed from the cab of the truck.
(Transcriber's note: The dead were identified later as:
PHILIP J. ASTON, 30, Essington, Penna.
PHILIP J. ASTON, JR., 7, his son, Essington, Penna.
JACK ASTON, R.D. 1, Ridley Park, Penna., PHILIP'S brother.
PEGGY RAY, aged 5, 101 Massasoit Avenue, Essington, Penna.
ABRAHAM BENOWITZ, 24, 1671 N. Lindenwood Street, Philadelphia, driver of the oil truck.)
The deputy coroner said the condition of the bodies was such that it might take hours for identification. Police from Philadelphia and five nearby townships were attempting to trace families of those who might have been occupants of the car, he said.
A tentative list of the injured, taken to Taylor Hospital, Ridley Park, included:
MRS. ANNA YADVISCINVZAK, 30.
MRS. ANNA BARONSKY.
MRS. JANE RAY, 25.
BEVERLEY RAY, 3.
HOWARD RAY, JR., 7.
HOWARD RAY, SR., all of Lester, Pa.
J. J. O'KANE, 42, Philadelphia, identified by officials of the Philadelphia Transportation Company as motor-man of the trolley, was also taken to Taylor Hospital.
A spokesman for the PTC who declined use of his name, said the accident was one of the worst the line had ever had. He said the tank truck, with a 4,200-gallon fuel oil capacity, struck the trolley near the front, then burst into flames which enveloped the entire car.
Norman Walls, chief of the nearby Tinicum Twp. Police, said the bodies of the victims were so badly burned it was impossible to tell whether they were men, woman or children. The toll would have been higher, Walls said, except that some passengers had just changed to another car.
Fire companies from Philadelphia and surrounding townships responded to calls put in by passing motorists who first arrived on the scene.
Walls said the truck was owned by the Leaman Transportation company, Downingtown, Pa.

Clearfield Progress Pennsylvania 1945-12-29