Susquehanna Depot, PA Locomotive Explosion, Feb 1872

A FEARFUL EXPLOSION -- HORRIBLE BLOW UP ON THE ERIE RAILROAD.

A LOCOMOTIVE DEMOLISHED ON THE OWEGO GRADE.

ONE MAN KILLED, SEVERAL FATALLY INJURED AND SEVERAL MISSING.

THE CARS TAKE FIRE -- GREAT EXCITEMENT AT SUSQUEHANNA.

Susquehanna Depot, Pa., Feb. 14, 1872
About eight o'clock last night the authorities about the Erie depot at this place, as well as the entire village, were attracted by the loud and continued whistle of a locomotive coming down the grade east of the station and by a bright light in the east. The headlight of the locomotive soon became visible, and it was seen to be approaching at a fearful rate. It stopped at the depot and the engineer, as well as his excitement and apparent fright would permit him stated to the astonished crowd that hed assembled that pusher engine 251, which left the place together with the engine which had just arrived, behind extra freight 36 a few minutes before, had exploded about three miles up the grade and nine persons on the engine and caboose ahead of it had been killed.
A surgeon and a number of citizens were at once sent to the scene of the reported disaster by the rail road officials. Upon arriving there a fearful scene met their sight. Down a bank thirty feet laid the demolished locomotive, and in the glare of burning freight and cars laid four prostrate forms, one of them ghastly in death. Although the report of the engineer at Susquehanna was not found to be strictly true. The disaster was yet a fearful one.
The particulars as given by one of the trainmen are as follows:
Extra train, No. 36, MINOR KEYES, conductor, left Susquehanna about half-past seven o'clock, with the pusher No. 251 and another one to help her up the grade. The grade, is about seventy five feet to the mile, and to raise it freight trains are obliged to have the aid of one or more pushers, engines without tenders, and very powerful ones too. When about half way to the summit the boiler of 251 exploded, the break occurring in front, in the under side.

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