Coos Bay, OR Steamer CZARINA Wrecked, Jan 1910

czarina Steamer Oregon Steamer Czarina ORE sinking

DEAD IN STEAMER WRECK.

TWENTY-FOUR GO DOWN.

TWENTY-FOUR OUT OF CREW OF THIRTY-ONE GO DOWN TO WATERY GRAVES.

Marshfield, Ore., Jan. 14. -- Of 31 men on the steamer Czarina, which struck on the Coos Bay bar and was wrecked, two have been rescued, and there is a possibility that five others, including Capt. DUGAN and HAROLD MILLS, will be saved. HARRY KENTZELL, first assistant engineer, was found unconscious in the breakers late yesterday, and early today J. ROBINSON, second assistant, was washed ashore.
Several hours after KENTZELL was rescued he regained consciousness and said that Capt. DUGAN and MILLS, the only passenger, had been bound to one of the masts. ROBINSON added that when the forward mast, to which he and five others had climbed, went by the board, the master, the first officer, MILLER, and two seamen, were alive in the after rigging. These, ROBINSON said, were the only ones left on the ship. Watchers on the beach after ROBINSON was rescued said that they saw a light flare from the wreck, which was taken to mean that the five men survive.
Listing of men on the Czarina:
CHARLES J. DUGGAN, captain.
JAMES HUGHES.
BENJAMIN F. HEDGES.
S. A. ELLEFSEN.
HENRY H. KINTZEL.
CHARLES BOSTROM.
ADAM ROKKA.
MINDOR OLSEN.
CHARLES CURRAN.
ANDREW AHLSTEDT.
RHINEHOLD HAGENER.
JOHN McNICHOLAS.
HENRY YOUNG.
JOHN H. ROBINSON.
CHARLES A. THOMPSON.
THOMAS BILBOA.
ANGELO PUNTAS.
COLUMBUS OTERA.
AUGUST YALADERIS.
JOSE MARTINEZ.
NICHOLAS A. QUIROGA.
JOE DE SOTA.
JOE PILES.
HAROLD B. MILLIS, passenger.
HARRY H. KINTZEL, first assistant engineer.
All night watchers patrolled the shore. Among them were C. T. Millis, steamship agent of the Southern Pacific Company at Marshfield, and his wife. Early in the night they gave up hope of again seeing alive their son HAROLD, a boy of 20 years, who had left them bound for college. When KENTZELL was rescued hope for the moment sprang up, only to be dashed to earth by the assertion of H. J. McKeown that he had seen both masts of the Czarina through marine glasses, and that a rope ladder was carried away, and with it its human burden.
The steamer left port in a gale. Tremendous seas were breaking over the bar as the Czarina attempted to pass into the ocean. Those on shore who had gathered to watch the departure of the boat were startled to see the Czarina sweeping toward the north spit. Her engines apparently had been disabled. The heavy seas seemed to envelop the steamer and she drifted rapidly on the spit at a point about a mile above the jetty.
The crew crowded into the rigging and could be seen making frantic signals for help, while hundreds on shore were compelled to stand by and see man after man washed overboard. So rough was the sea that efforts of the life saving crew to launch a boat were futile. Attempts to shoot a life line across the vessel failed.

Sheboygan Press Wisconsin 1910-01-15