Cumminsville, ON Powder Explosion, Oct 1884

THREE EXPLOSIONS.

SHAKE UP THE COUNTRY ABOUT TORONTO, CANADA.

FOUR MEN KILLED AND TWO OTHERS BADLY WOUNDED -- NARROW ESCAPE FROM AN AWFUL CALAMITY -- THE DETAILS.

Toronto, Ont., Oct. 11. -- An explosion occurred at Cumminsville, a little town sixteen miles from Hamilton at noon Thursday. The gunpowder and dualin mills of the Hamilton Powder company at that place were blown up. There were three successive explosions within about two minutes of each other, and the result was somewhat similar to a tremendous earthquake. Two of the explosions were greater than the third. The first wo were greater than the third. The first two were plainly felt at Hamilton, where houses were shaken and the citizens badly frightened. Many were under the impression at Hamilton and the surrounding towns where the shocks were felt that there had been a severe earthquake and great excitement prevailed for several hours before the real cause of the explosion was known, as it was thought by many that a second shock of earthquake would follow. When the real cause of the noise was learned, the excitement was even greater than before, as a number of men belonging in Hamilton are employed in these powder-mills. The first intelligence of the explosion said it had been accompanied by a large loss of life.
Only four men were, however, killed, and but two were seriously wounded. The killed are WILLIAM MURRAY, HENRY TIBBLES, GEORGE MATTHEWS, all married men with families, and WILLIAM HATHERINGTON, a single man. The wounded are ALBERT CULP, badly burned, and DANIEL DAUGHERTY, badly burned, with some limbs broken. The telegraph office at Cumminsville is not in working order, and full details of the disaster have not yet reached here. It is not known what caused the explosion. All the men employed at the powder mills were in the village at dinner, except the six above named, when the explosion occurred. Had it been otherwise, the loss of life must have been very large. There is hardly a whole pane of glass left in Cumminsville, although the powder-mill was about a mile from its center. Two women who were walking in Cumminsville at the time of the explosion were blown against a house with great violence, but escaped without serious injury. A cat that was in the powder-mills at the time of the explosion was thrown into the air, but came down alive, with most of its fur singed off.

Daily Leader Eau Claire Wisconsin 1884-10-11