Arn-Piror, ON Fire, Aug 1876

A CANADIAN INCENDIARY.

HE SETS FIRE TO A BUILDING OWNED BY HIM IN ARN-PRIOR, ONTARIO--HIS ESCAPE TO THIS COUNTRY AND SUBSEQUENT ARREST.

On the night of Aug. 4, 1876, a fire broke out in a house in process of construction in Arn-Prior, Renfrew County, Ontario, owned by Allan James Simpson, a carpenter, who had been a resident of the village for several years. The building was burned down and the flames communicated to the adjoining premises, and before the villagers could check the progress of the fire a most disastrous conflagration ensued, resulting in the destruction of 24 of the best residences in the village. An investigation convinced the authorities that the fire was of incendiary origin, and as Simpson and his family disappeared immediately after the fire, suspicion naturally attached to him as the incendiary. Search was made for him by the Canadian detectives, but proved unsuccessful. About two weeks ago a letter was received from Simpson by the agents of the insurance company in which his property was insured, inclosing a claim be speedily settled. This letter was addressed from No. 615 West Forty-eighth street in this City, and was the first clue the authorities obtained to his whereabouts. A warrant was at once procured for his arrest, and Detective Cinq-Mars of the Dominion Police came to this City in search of him. Calling on Superintendent Walling for aid, Detective King, of the Central Office, was detailed to assist him. The officers went to No. 615 West Forty-eighth street, and found that Simpson did not live there, but the detectives learned that his letters were received there, and thence forwarded to No. 218 West Twentieth street. Simpson was found at the latter place, living with his wife and family. He was arrested, and yesterday morning was arraigned before Justice Murray at the Essex Market Police Court. Detective Cinq-Mars produces the warrants which had been issued for the arrest of Simpson. The prisoner admitted that he was the person named in the warrant, and waiving all formalities, expressed his willingness to return to Canada with the officer and stand trial. Justice Murray thereupon indorsed the warrant, and the prisoner was delivered into the custody of Detective Cinq-Mars, who left the City on the evening train with his prisoner.

The New York Times, New York, NY 15 Jul 1877