Georgian Bay, ON (Lake Huron) Steamer MANASCO Lost, Sep 1928

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LAKE STEAMER MANASCO GOES DOWN, 17 MEN STILL MISSING.

VESSEL FOUNDERED SATURDAY MORNING IN GEORGIAN BAY.

FIVE MEN RESCUED MONDAY AFTERNOON.

Owen Sound, Ont., Sept. 18. -- At daybreak today all available ships from Georgian Bay ports and airplanes from the Royal Canadian Air Force base at Camp Borden joined in an intensive search of Georgian Bay, in the hope that some of the 17 men missing following the foundering of the lake steamer Manasco would be found.
The searchers will be spurred by the knowledge that any survivors if alive, will be in a desperate plight. If any are found alive they will have withstood storm, sunburn, thirst and hunger in open boats for nearly three days, for the Manasco
foundered without warning in a heavy sea early Saturday morning.
The Manasco was without wireless equipment and when disaster overtook her off Griffith's Island at 3:00 o'clock in the morning, no call for assistance could be sent.
Yesterday afternoon the Canadian Pacific steamship lake boat Manitoba sighted a raft near Vail Island, not far from where the Manasco went down. Five exhausted men who had drifted helplessly for sixty hours were rescued, and the Manitoba brought them to this port with the first news of the lake tragedy. A sixth man had managed to get aboard the raft when the Manasco foundered, Chief Engineer THOMAS McCUTCHEN, but he died of exposure an hour before the rescue came. His body was stripped of clothing needed to keep the sun and wind from a poorly clad man on the raft and his body was then consigned to the waves. The raft was becoming unseaworthy because of leaking pontoons.
Two of the men rescued yesterday, Captain N. McKAY, brother of the master of the Manasco, and E. W. WALLACE, a passenger, could not have survived a few hours more exposure. Survivors told of seeing in the gray dawn of Saturday morning a lifeboat upside down with two men clinging to it. They could not have held on for many hours. Another lifeboat, whether empty or full, was not determined, was sighted in the distance before the wind carried the raft away from the scene of the shipwreck.

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