Collinsville, OK Lightning Strike Kills Five, May 1913

LIGHTNING KILLS FIVE OKLAHOMANS.

BOLT THAT HITS WAGON IN TULSA OIL FIELD PROVES FATAL TO WORKMEN.

WELLS AND TANKS BURN.

SHOES AND STOCKINGS WERE TORN FROM FEET - DOCTORS TRIED TO REVIVE VICTIMS WITH ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION, BUT IN VAIN - PROPERTY LOSS $50,000.

Tulsa, Okla., May 13. - The lives of five men were snuffed out and heavy damages wrought through the Tulsa oil district this morning when a terrific electrical storm hit here.
A bolt of lightning struck an oil field wagon a mile and a half out of Collinsville carrying seven employees of the Texas company to their work. Five of them were killed instantly while the other two were severely shocked and had their shoes and stockings torn off their feet.
The dead are: E. S. LINN; E. E. BITTNER; F. S. STEPHENS; HARRY GIRARD; and TOM CLARK. Doctors worked for two hours in an effort to revive the men but the artificial respiration failed.
The other two men were GEORGE BEAR, driver, and JEAN RENEAU. One of the horses was killed. JEAN RENEAU, also son of a pioneer liveryman of this city, and who had feet badly burned, half fell and half crawled off the wagon. He dragged himself to a farm house nearly a quarter of a mile away to tell news of the disaster.
When help arrived at the scene of the electrocution there was still a spark of life in LINN, a nineteen year old boy. He was hurried to Collinsville in time to be placed on a Santa Fe train and sent to Bartlesville. Three physicians worked a pulmotor in an effort to revive him. Two hours work proved fruitless and he was declared dead. LINN is the nephew of Dr. R. S. Linn, a prominent Tulsa physician.
Numerous steel tanks and oil wells were ignited by electricity.
The property damage was heaviest in the Glenn pool oil field where the Texas company and the Gulf Pipe Line company lost four 1600 barrel wooden oil tanks. The Gulf's tanks contained 6,400 barrels of oil and the Texas company lost 3,600 barrels in the Cushing field. The Thompson Oil company lost four 1,600 barrel tanks containing about 1,800 barrels of oil. The loss on those three properties reaches nearly $50,000.
Several drilling rigs were blown down in various parts of the district. In the Collinsville field two power plants were flooded and put out of commission. It is reported tonight that the oil storage tanks on the A. L. Brown property at Collinsville are burning as result of lightning. All streams are swollen and roads made impassable. Field work has been greatly impeded.

The Dighton Herald Kansas 1913-05-18