Cincinnati, OH Tornado Hits City, July 1915

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FEAR FORTY DEAD IN CINCINNATI TORNADO; LOSS OF $1,000,000.

PLACES IN KENTUCKY AND MISSOURI ALSO HARD HIT, WITH LIFE LOSS REPORTED -- STORM, SOON OVER, LEAVES WIDE PATH OF RUIN -- RIVER BOATS GO TO THE BOTTOM.

Cincinnati, July 8. -- Cincinnati today gathered the harvest of death and devastation sowed by last night's terrific tornado.
Hourly the list of dead swelled as police and firemen dug into the ruins of homes and dragged the river for the dead who perished when the towboat Dick Fulton, the steamer Convoy, and a shanty boat went down during the gale.
Police estimated nearly 40 persons perished. Fifteen known dead and scores missing and injured was the score at 10 a.m. Property damage was estimated at $1,000,000. Louisville, Ky., at first reported hard hit, suffered comparatively slight damage and nobody was killed or seriously injured, according to passengers arriving here today.
The tornado destroyed hundreds of plate glass store windows and outside show cases. It ripped the heaviest signs from their fastenings. It turned over automobiles standing on the street. It uprooted hundreds of trees. It is the greatest disaster that has ever befallen Cincinnati. And it all happened in 10 minutes.
Nearly 20 were buried under the buildings that stood at 568, 570, 572, and 574 West Sixth Street. At least four were buried in the ruins of the building that stood at 643 West Eighth Street.
At 643 West Eighth Street the storm entombed the families of MEYER and ISRAEL TENNEBAUM. It then twisted cat-a-corner over three blocks and buried the family of MRS. ESTHER COHEN of the TENNEBAUM'S, whose husband has a grocery at 570 West Sixth Street.
Most of the victims were asleep when entrapped.
Above the din of the storm and the falling wreckage could be heard the cries of dying women and men.

Trenton Evening Times New Jersey 1915-07-07