Mahoning, OH Train Wreck, Feb 1902

21 INJURED IN ERIE WRECK.

Train Ditched in Ohio---President Ramsay of the Wabash a Passenger----General Manager Blickensderfer Hurt.

CLEVELAND, Feb. 12.---Train No. 10 of the Erie Railroad after leaving Cleveland at 1 P.M. to-day for New York was wrecked between Mahoning and Phalanx, Ohio. The whole train left the tracks and ran on for twenty car lengths, finally toppling over in a ditch. Twenty-one persons are reported injured, but it is believed there were not fatalities. As the train was made up in this city most of the injured are probably residents of Cleveland.

There were a buffet car, two sleepers, chair car, coach, and baggage and express cars. Physicians were called from Warren and Youngstown and left at once for Leavittsburg, where some of the injured had been taken.

The engineer was Matthew Shay of Youngstown and George Hopper of Cleveland was the conductor. Neither was hurt. Among the injured are Robert Blickensderfer, General Manager of the Wabash Railroad in St. Louis, who came out with his mouth cut and his body bruised, and Max Tarshis of New York, whose arm was hurt.

The cause of the wreck is said to have been spreading rails. Most of the injured were in the coach next to the last, that last being the private car of Joseph Ramsay, President of the Wabash Railroad.

Mr. Ramsay did heroic work in assisting the injured. He has wired his friends that his party will go east via Pittsburg.

The New York Times, New York, NY 13 Feb 1902

TRAIN'S WILD DASH INTO DITCH

Twenty-one Passengers Injured in Wreck on the Erie Railroad.

CLEVELAND, Ohio, Feb. 12.---Train No. 10, on the Erie Railroad, leaving Cleveland at 1 P.M. for New York, was wrecked between Mahoning and Phalanx, Ohio, about 40 miles from this city, this afternoon. The whole train left the tracks and ran on for twenty car lengths, finally toppling over into a ditch. Twenty-one persons are reported injured, but it is believed no fatalities occurred.

The train consisted of a buffet car, two sleepers, chair car, coach, baggage and express. Physicians were called from Warren and Youngstown and left at once for Leavittsburg, where some of the injured had been taken. Some of the more seriously injured were taken to Youngstown. The wrecked train is one of the finest on the Erie road, and is vestibuled.

George Thomas, of Cleveland, received what is feared to be fatal injuries, brain concussion. Among the others injured are C. S. Rusling, Philadelphia, arm and hand hurt; J. T. Blair, Greenville, Pa.; Mrs. Fred. Kueh, Newcastle, Pa.; Joseph Coglan, Girard, Pa., arm and shoulder bruised; George Eckert, Meadville, Pa.

The Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia, PA 13 Feb 1902