41 killed as train hits coach at Ohio junction

AKRON, Ohio, July 31 — A head-on
collision on the Pennsylvania Railroad
carried forty-one persons to
flaming death tonight.
A gasoline-propelled railroad motor
coach, shuttling from Hudson,
Ohio, to Akron, and a double-header
freight train of seventy-three
cars crashed. The motor coach,
pushed back 200 yards along the
track, burst into flames.
Railroad officials said the coach,
shuttling from Hudson, Ohio, to
Akron, failed somehow to take a
siding to allow the double-engined,
seventy-three-car freight train to
pass.
All those killed were in the steel
coach, whose gasoline tanks, bursting
at the deafening impact, turned
the car into a fiery trap. Coroner
R. E. Amos said most of the victims
were burned to death.
All the passengers died.
THE IDENTIFIED DEAD
The coroner gave out the following
list of identified dead late tonight:
LAWRENCE C. LETZKUS, Pittsburgh.
E. C. CLIFFORD, Cuyahoga Falls,
Ohio.
W. P. McKEE, Akron.
RUSSELL WAY, Akron.
CHARLES BILDERBACK, baggageman,
Orrville, Ohio.
NELSON VAUGHAN," Cuyahoga
Falls.
CAMERON MORRIS, Cuyahoga
Falls.
BRUCE KELLEY, Akron.
E. W. GIBBONS, Endicott, N. Y.
F R E D PALMER, no address.
WILBUR D. HARPLEY, no address.
F. H. DUVE, Akron.
C. E . TARLETON, Akron.
A. L. BAILISS, brakeman, no address.
CLEON WILLIS, Cuyahoga Falls.
ALBERT C. BURKE, train dispatcher,
Cuyahoga Falls.
CHARLES W. FRANK, Akron.
WILLIAM SCHMITZ, Wheeling,
W. Va.
ROBERT EDGAR OREM, no address.
CHARLES T. SQUIRES, Cuyahoga
Falls.
LOUIS FOUNTAIN, porter, St.
Petersburg, Fla.
Flames Surround Wreckage
The engineman and conductor of
the coach leaped to safety, but were
severely injured. Another trainman,
riding home, also lived to tell of
the tragedy. Recapitulation five
hours after the collision, which occurred
at 6 P . M., local time, indicated
that these three were the only
survivors.
Railroad officials expressed a belief
that four or five other trainmen,
aboard the coach, also were
killed.
The engine crews of the two
freight locomotives were injured,
apparently not seriously.

Aug. 1, 1940 edition of "The New York Times"