Painesville, OH Train And Auto Bus Collide, Mar 1922

14 KILLED AT RAILWAY CROSSING.

FAST TRAIN PLOWS INTO AUTO BUS CROWDED WITH PASSENGERS ON WAY HOME.

PAINESVILLE, OHIO, SCENE OF DISASTER -- FAST EXPRESS ON NEW YORK CENTRAL, RUNNING AT 60 MILE SPEED, RUNS DOWN MOTOR CAR -- MOST OF VICTIMS WERE RETURNING FROM SOCIAL FESTIVITIES -- CROSSING WATCHMAN FLAGGED BUS.

Cleveland, O., Mar. 4. -- The death of GEORGE E. McGHEE today brought the toll from the collision between a New York Central express train and an automobile bus at Painesville late last night up to 14. Five persons are seriously injured, three of whom are expected to die.
A coroner's inquest will be held at Painesville this afternoon. City officials of Painesville and officials of the New York Central railroad started investigations this morning.
Following is a corrected list of dead and injured, as announced by the Painesville police today.
The Dead:
GEORGE E. McGHEE, Medina.
JOHN STURMS.
MAX STURMS.
LILLIAN KELTO.
HILDA PRASKI.
MRS. OSCAR COOPER.
MRS. JOHN BARTISS.
MRS. FRANK FRIDEBAUGH.
STANLEY RADICK, all of Fairport.
RICHARD STRAND, Chardon.
KATHRYN HORVATH, Richmond.
WILLIAM J. SUTTER, JR., Chardon.
RAYMOND O'LEARY, Painesville.
The Injured:
ANDREW ADAMS, Fairport, driver of the bus, dying.
MRS. MARTIN STEINBACK, Fairport, believed to be critical.
NICK NENNO, Fairport, believed dying.
H. RAYMOND HAMILTON, Fairport, serious.
CHARLES SULLIVAN, Painesville, fractured ribs.
Three of the dead were found on the locomotive pilot when the train in charge of engineer F. S. Fernandez, of Buffalo, and conductor G. Ernest was brought from its sixty mile an hour pace to a halt about three blocks from the scene of the collision.
Most of those killed were residents of Fairport. Many of them had left a dance hall in Painesville, less than half an hour before the crash, while several others had attended a lodge meeting. Two had just boarded the bus and had just settled in their seats when the accident occurred.
An explosion of the gasoline tank of the machine set fire to the debris and several of the bodies were badly burned. The bus, which was operated between Painesville and Fairport was making its last trip to Fairport for the night.
A. W. Barnes, the crossing watchman, declared he flagged the driver, who had stopped on the south side of the tracks to pick up passengers. A declaration by Chester Parrish, manager of the bus line, that a large oil tank obstructed driver ADAMS' view of the watchman's lantern and the approaching train, was discounted by CARL SULLIVAN, one of the injured. "I saw the train before we reached the tracks," SULLIVAN said. "We had stopped to take on two passengers just south of the railroad or we would have been across."
"People near me screamed as the engine came on. I saw the driver reach down and pull something. I don't know whether it speeded us up or slowed us down. It was dark inside the machine. I thought we had cleared the track. Then it hit us."
The train number 600, was composed of 20 express coaches. It was made up here to go to Buffalo and does not stop at Painesville.
"I blew the whistle just as we reached the limits of the town," engineer Fernandez declared. "An instant later I saw the automobile on the track immediately ahead of me. The space before we struck it was so brief. I could not even know whether the automobile was standing or in motion."
"As I threw on the brakes, I felt the collision and fragments of the wreckage flew past the engine cab. I am sure we stopped as quickly as possible."
The story of fireman, Milo Cornell, also of Buffalo, coincided with that of the engineer.

Steubenville Herald Star Ohio 1922-03-04