Canton, OH Seven Boilers Explode, May 1910

TWENTY KILLED BY EXPLOSIONS.

BATTERY OF SEVEN BOILERS AT CANTON, O., BLOWS UP.

BODIES ARE BADLY MUTILATED.

SOME OF THEM THROWN HUNDREDS OF FEET BY THE FORCE OF THE EXPLOSION -- FIFTY MEN INJURED, SOME OF THEM FATALLY -- BIG PLANT IN A STATE OF RUIN AND WILL BE A TOTAL LOSS.

Canton, O., May 18. -- With a roar that was heard three miles away a battery of seven boilers at the plant of the American Sheet and Tin Plate Company exploded, killing from twenty to thirty men and injuring fifty more.
Among the injured are a half dozen, who it is said, will probably die.
The list of known dead is:
GEORGE A. LEMLEY.
_____ ROVER, engineer.
CHARLES DE WITT, engineer.
WALTER RINGONBERGER, beater
GEORGE BOLE, beater.
CHARLES BROWN, beater.
JAY HENRY, catcher, North Industry.
JACK WHEELING.
HARRY HALTZLEY.
HERMAN LOTHAMER, dubler.
PETER WOOLGOOF, ash wheeler.
F. DUNLAP.
CHARLES ROBINSON.
_____ STULZ.
Missing and believed to be dead:
CHARLES DEWITT, engineer.
WILLIAM AUSTIN, fireman.
ROMAINE BOYER, ash hauler.
The cause of the explosion is at present unknown.
The firemen and engineer, who were both in the boiler room, are dead.
No one else about the plant who survived the accident can give an explanation. One workman says he heard three distinct explosions in quick succession. They came so close, however, that it was all over in a minute. The force of the concussion was terrific. The big plant is in such a state of ruin as to be practically a total loss. A mere shell of the building is left. Identification of the men was difficult because many of them were so mutilated that even their most intimate friends could not recognize their features.
The superintendent of the plant put foremen at work trying to make a list of the dead, injured and missing.
Members of bereaved families rushed frantically to the plant and thence to hospitals and residences near the ruined shops in an effort to find a trace of their loved ones. It is thought that all of the dead have been removed from the debris.
It was stated that, so far as known, the dead numbered twenty, but this did not include any who had died at their homes after removal from the ruins.
The body of one man, unknown, was blown through a house over 700 feet from the plant. The body entered the house from the east side and continued in a straight line through a bedroom and out the other side of the building. The torso of another man was found in the garden of a yard about 500 feet west of the scene. Arms, legs and parts of bodies were strewn about the neighborhood.
The bodies of seven men, mutilated beyond recognition, were found in the north end of the mill.
"For God's sake hit me on the head and kill me,"
cried one workman to a man who found him. The injured man had an arm torn off and a great hole in his side.
The plant had five mills. All the employes working at mills Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 were either killed or injured, while the men in mill No. 5, furthest from the boilers, escaped serious injury.

Austin Daily Herald Minnesota 1910-05-18