Cincinnati, OH Building Collapse, Mar 1930

SEARCH RUINS OF CINCINNATI BUILDING FOR BODY.

DEATH LIST REACHES 3; MANY OTHERS ARE HURT.

OVERLOADING OF WAREHOUSE ON FREEMAN AVENUE WITH ROOFING PAPER CAUSES STRUCTURE TO COLLAPSE -- OWNERS HAD BEEN WARNED.

Cincinnati, March 29. -- (AP) -- Three men were killed, and the body of a third was sought in the ruins of a four-story warehouse building that collapsed yesterday. Another man was probably fatally injured and four more severely injured.
HOWARD MANIFOLD, 19, a shipping clerk for the Southeast Joslyn Co., which occupied the two lower floors, was missing after firemen and workers searched the ruins all night long and found his body in the debris today.
HARRY HAVERKAMP, 16, a clerk for the same company, died last night. He was caught in the wreckage when hundreds of tons of roofing paper, stored on the two upper floors by the Flintkote Company, roofing manufacturers, caused the building to buckle and crumble late yesterday.
The body of CARL WESTENDORF, a stenographer, was recovered late yesterday.
Five other men, three of them negroes, were in the building when it fell, and only one, a negro laborer, escaped unhurt. ROBERT G. MARKS, 28, who was installing a recording device, suffered a fractured skull and may die. JOHN STEYENS, 18, a stenographer, ROBERT THOMAS, 35, and MONROE HENTON, 32, all negroes, were hurt less seriously.
Floodlights blazed over the wreckage as the rescue crews worked through the night in shifts, taking their meals on the job. Sanwiches by the hundreds were brought to the scene, that the work might not be interrupted.
Late last night, after a feverish day of activity, freight cars were brought into use to remove the debris. They were backed onto a spur track alongside the building, where three cars earlier in the day had been engulfed by the falling wreckage.
Three large steam shovels and a dozen trucks were tearing away the pile of debris as rapidly as possible.
Nearly 200 firemen, wrecking crew men and laborers, with the steam shovels and trucks, worked throughout the afternoon and evening, with the assistance of 15 fire companies, scores of police, the Salvage Corps and a number of volunteers.
Knowing that the two missing men were buried deep under the debris, the rescuers held out little hope for either of them from the beginning of their operations, but this did not prevent them from hurrying along in hopes that they might reach one or both of the men in time to save their lives.
The front end of the building collapsed completely, burying the entire office of the Joslyn Company and carrying with it part of an adjoining three-story building, in which five negro residents narrowly escaped injury.
Large holes were torn in the brick walls of the second and third floors of the adjoining building, and occupants of the two floors were removed to safety by firemen with ladders.

Hamilton Dialy News Ohio 1930-03-29