Skip to Content

Stellarton, NS Mine Explosion, Apr 1935

Stellarton Miners Memorial, Pictou County NS.jpg

BLAST TRAPS SEVEN IN CANADIAN MINE.

COLLIERS BELIEVED KILLED AS TONS OF ROCK AND COAL CRASH ON DIGGINS 1,500 FEET DOWN.

BLOCKS RESCUERS.

WIVES AND RELATIVES GATHER AT PIT MOUTH IN NOVA SCOTIA, BUT FIND LITTLE HOPE.

Stellarton, N.S. -- (CP) -- Seven coal miners are believed to have been killed today in an explosion which sent hundreds of tons of rock and coal crashing down on their working place in the Allan shaft, where eighty-eight men perished in an explosion in 1918.
The men were trapped 1,500 feet underground while rescue workers were trying to fight their way through a barrier of fallen debris which clogged the passageway for 1,000 feet.
The mass of coal and stone blocked the way to safety for any possible survivors, though little hope was held that any still lived. Fearful fellow workers expressed belief all must have been buried alive.
All others of the 196 men who entered the pit today were accounted for, according to D. H. McLean, superintendent of the Acadia Coal Company, and Dominic Nearing, sub-district board member for the United Mine Workers. They were all on the surface except for rescue crews and about fifteen officials who had stayed below to supervise the work of digging for the trapped colliers.
The cause of the explosion was undetermined. The nearest workers, 1,500 feet away from the spot where the seven were working, said they heard only a dull, muffled thud followed by a whistling blast of air which swept one man off his feet and hurled him several yards.
The seven men trapped are:
ROSS FLEMING.
DICK CLARK.
ALEXANDER J. BEATON.
ABRAHAM HENNESSEY.
EGNUT BORTNICK.
JAMES A. McEACHERN.
JOHN McEACHERN.
Wives and relatives of the missing men gathered anxiously around the pit mouth as soon as word of the explosion spread through the town. This afternoon hundreds milled about the colliery yard, waiting anxiously for word from below.
What news trickled up carried little hope. Crews equipped with masks for work in gas and some
"bare-faced" miners had gone down, but they could find no trace of the buried men.

Florence Morning News South Carolina 1935-04-19



article | by Dr. Radut