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Fargo, ND Storm, Jul 1890

FEARFUL STORM IN FARGO.

THE TOWN COMPLETELY WRECKED BY A FURIOUS WIND.

Seven Persons Killed and Many Injured by a Heavy Blow---Houses Unroofed and a Train Blown Off the Track.

ST. PAUL, Minn., July 7.----A report is current that the town of Fargo was completely swept away by a cyclone this forenoon and that Morehead which lies in Minnesota, east of Fargo, was also slightly damaged. Of course, if the report is true, there must have been great loss of life in Fargo, and all indications tend to confirm the reports.

A railroad man who arrived from that place this forenoon, says that a terrific wind storm prevailed this forenoon and that several trains were blown from the tracks. All the wires to Fargo are down and the Western Union officials report about two miles of telegraph wires near Fargo, and between there and here have been blown down. West of Fargo, they say, are worse conditions, and they say that miles and miles of poles are down.

A DETAILED ACCOUNT.

ST. PAUL, Minn., July 7.---The Wahpeton, N. D., correspondent of the Pioneer Press telegraphs his paper as follows:

"A straight wind from the Northwest struck Fargo at 2:30 o'clock a.m. Great damage was done the city. Electric light towers were blown down. Whole blocks were unroofed. The Yerxai Wigwam, McGill & Co.'s warehouse, the opera house, the Republican office, Keen's block, the Chapin block, the Exchange Hotel, the Continental block and the Manitoba freight house were unroofed and the Milwakee[sic] depot blown down. A dozen small houses were razed and almost every plate-glass window on Front street and Broadway broken.

The Jay Cooke Hotel and the Grand Pacific at Moorehead were unroofed. The residence of the late Capt. McCarthy was demolished. Several children were instantly killed and Mrs. McCarthy is not expected to live. Two unknown tramps, who were sleeping in a box car were killed.

TRAIN BLOWN OFF THE TRACK.

The No.1 passenger train on the Northern Pacific going west had just pulled out of the yards and had stopped at the Milwaukee crossing. The train was made up of three baggage cars, nine coaches and sleepers, a party of Chicago and Northwestern officials in a private car and Superintendent McCabe's car. All the coaches and the tender were blown from the track. No lives were lost and nobody seriously hurt. The lights had been put out, so that there was no fire or steam. Superintendent McCabe and the conductor, brakeman and porters acted very coolly and calmed the frightened passengers, who were sent back to the city in special coaches.

THE REPORT CONFIRMED.

MILWAUKEE, Wis., July 7.---Advices have been received at the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul offices from their agent at Fargo to the effect that the town is pretty well wiped out. Several people were killed and a number injured. The Northern Pacific train was blown from the track.

AN EYE WITNESS' REPORT.

MINNEAPOLIS, July 7.----A Detroit, Minnesota, special to the Journal says:

Your correspondent has just arrived from Fargo. A terrible tornado struck the town early this morning. Seven were killed and nineteen wounded. The Northern Pacific train was blown off the track west of the city. There was great destruction to buildings. Full particulars coming.

THE SIGNAL OFFICER'S REPORT.

WASHINGTON, July 7.---The signal officer at Morehead, Minnesota, reports to the chief signal officer as follows: "There was a thunder storm from the Northwest at 3:30 o'clock this morning. Great damage to property. Seven lives lost. Thirteen injured.

The Macon Telegraph, Macon, GA 8 Jul 1890



article | by Dr. Radut