NC, VA, Hurricane Of 1933, Sept 1933

GALE ROARS DOWN OVER CAROLINAS.

COASTAL CITIES 'DIG IN' IN FACE OF TERRIFIC WIND.

SHIPPING NEARS STANDSTILL BEFORE THREAT OF HURRICANE SWEEPING UP COAST FROM FLORIDA; STORM EXPECTED TO HIT HARDEST AT CAPE HATTERAS, WILMINGTON AND VIRGINIA BEACHES.

Wilimngton, Sept. 15 -- (UP) -- Taking every precaution, residents of the Carolinas and Virginia "dug in" today to guard against the vicious winds of a tropical storm that is expected to strike the coast tonight or early Saturday.
Coastwise vessels and residents along the beaches were warned that the winds were of great instensity, and the hurricane winds would be over a sonsiderable area.
The storm is expected to strike the Atlantic coast between Cape Hatteras and Wilmington. Reports at 11:30 a.m., chartered the hurricane as approximately 300 miles east of Savannah, Ga., and 200 miles south of Cape Hatteras, moving northwest or northwest by north, with the center reaching the southern coast of North Carolina late tonight or Saturday morning.
Terrific Winds Coming Up.
Falling barometers in the area forecast the approach of the terrific winds, Charleston, S. C., reported increasing winds, although that port was believed to be out of the greatest danger from the storm. Hurricane warnings were not posted at Charleston, but they were raised from Wilmington to Cape Hatteras.
City officials at Southport, N. C., warned citizens of the storm and made preparations for extra forces to keep communication lines repaired in case of damage. Residents of both Southport and Brunswick county prepared for the storm.
Police were making a hours-to-house canvass at Willoughby Beach and Ocean View, hit so hard by the hurricane that struck in Virginia, August 23. The residents were being advised to leave their homes, although they were told they could use their own discretion. The storm will reach its height at 6 a.m. Saturday in that area, it was predicted.
The barometer was slightly below normal at Norfolk, Va., and was falling fast at Cape Hatteras.
Forty-Mile Gale.
Manteo, Sept. 15. -- (UP) -- Residents of Willoughby beach and Ocean View so hard hit by the hurricane of August 23, this morning were being warned by police of another storm, believed to be more severe, approaching and to vacate their homes.
Acting on the weather forecast of a hurricane tonight, predicted to reach its height tomorrow at 6 a.m., police were making a house to house canvass, telling people they can use their own discretion but advising them to leave their homes.
The barometer was slightly below normal here but was falling fast at Cape Hatteras on the North Carolina coast, where the weather bureau says the storm will strike first. The entire Carolina-Virginia coast has been warned of its approach.
Morehead City In Path.
Elizabeth City, Sept. 15. -- (UP) -- Advices received at coast guard headquarters here at noon today indicated the brunt of the hurricane will be felt at Cape Lookout, Beaufort and Morehead City.
The sea was reported running fairly high at Nag's Head and Kill Hill on the outer banks of the coast.
Weather was unsettled here with rain and brisk north and northeast winds. No serious blow was anticipated in this area.

The Daily Times-News Burlington North Carolina 1933-09-15

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N. C. REELS UNDER HURRICANE'S BLOW.

GALE RAGES WITH UNABATED FORCE CAUSING WIDESPREAD DAMAGE OVER COASTAL AREAS.

WATERS SWEEP OUT NEW BERN-NEUSE BRIDGE.

NEW BERN AND OTHER TOWNS COUNT DAMAGE IN MILLIONS.

STORM GAINING IN INTENSITY.

(By United Press)
Roaring winds of a tropical hurricane lasthed the North Carolina and Virginia coasts today, bringing with them exceedingly high tides and rains that were adding to the damage.
Two persons were known to have drowned while a third man was reported missing. The damage was estimated in several millions.
Several towns in the path of the storm were reported to be partially inundated while crippled communication lines to other cities hindered a complete report of damage in those sections.
The storm, which struck the coast cities last night and this morning, was the second to come out of the tropics this week. A hurricane sweeping the Mexican coast earlier caused 32 deaths and great property damage.
Norfolk, Va., which suffered the vicious winds of a tropical disturbance last month, again was flooded today by water almost a foot deep. Rains deluged the city and winds of 55 miles an hour were recorded.
The storm centered near Cape Hatteras at noon, and is moving northward about 10 miles an hour, expecting to pass near Cape Henry on the Virginia coast this afternoon or early tonight. Residents in that area had taken to safety to escape the storm's fury.
New York and New Jersey coasts also have been swept by rains the past four days with streets and cellars flooded.
Neuse River Bridge Washed Away.
Coast guard headquarters at Norfolk reported the bridge over the Neuse river at New Bern, N. C., had been swept away by high tides, but highway engineers at Raleigh expressed the opinion that only part of the mile long bridge erected at a cost of $300,000 had been swept away. Damage in the New Bern area was estimated at $1,000,000.
Communication with Morehead City, Beaufort and Elizabeth City, N. C., and at Hatteras, Va., was disrupted by the winds. Roofs were blown away from small buildings.
The excessive rains and high tides were doing much damage to crops, according to reports. Rain was reported as worse at Ocean View and Willoughby Beach, hit by the hurricane last month, than on any other place along the Virginia coast.
The deaths reported thus far occurred at sea where a seaman was swept to his death as a wave struck the motorship SUN, and a negro fisherman was drowned late yesterday near Nag's Head, N. C. MAXIE BARRY, a negro coastguardsman, was thought lost between Manleo, N. C., and the Sea Island coast guard station.
70-Mile Gale At Plymouth.
Plymouth, Sept. 16. -- (UP) -- A gale of 70-mile velocity swept Plymouth between 9:30 and 10:30 o'clock this morning, causing widespread damage to property but no casualties.
The town's populace "dug in" after the first blow in face of forecasts that the full force of the hurricane will strike here between noon and 2 o'clock this afternoon.
Roofs of many homes throughout the town were blown away and trees were uprooted. The lower part of the city was partially flooded with water.
It was still raining heavily at 12:30 p.m. and the barometer continued to fall.
New Bern Suffers Severely.
New Bern, Sept. 16. -- (UP) --The center of the tropical hurricane struck New Bern at 1 o'clock this morning with wind velocity between 65 and 80 miles an hour.
The mile-long bridge over the Neuse river was washed away by the highest tide in 30 years. Hundreds of persons were marooned by high water.
Damage in the city of New Bern and Craven county was estimated at approximately $1,000,000.
Commander D. F. DeOTTE, commander of the Coast Guard Cutter Pamlico, estimated the center of the storm hit here at 1 a.m. today.
New Bern at 10:30 a.m. had not established communication with Morehead City, Beaufort or other points on the coast of Carteret county below here. The waterfront here was piled with wreckage and debris and many small craft werer destroyed. Fall crops were practically destroyed by heavy rains.

NORFOLK AGAIN INUNDATED BY HEAVY FLOODS.

VIRGINIA BEACH AND OTHER RESORTS IN PATH 65-MILE GALE.

HEAVY RAINS WIDESPREAD.

Norfolk, Va., Sept. 16. -- (UP) -- Norfolk was flooded again today by water almost a foot deep as rain deluged the city with winds in excess of 55 miles an hour.
A 65-mile gale was reported at Virginia Beach, accompanied by high tides.
There were no available communications with Elizabeth City, N. C., below here, but the center of the hurricane had not reached that point.
Rain was reported as worse at Ocean View and Willoughby Beach than any other place along the Virginia coast.
Water reached the hub caps of automobiles on streets here.

The Daily Times-News Burlington North Carolina 1933-09-16

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N. C. COUNTS 15 DEAD IN HURRICANE.

SUFFERING IS WIDESPREAD IN COASTAL TOWNS.

RED CROSS RUSHES AID WITH STATE AND FEDERAL FUNDS.

MANY SECTIONS STILL ISOLATED.

Beaufort, Sept. 18. -- (UP) -- The known death toll of the hurricane in eastern North Carolina has mounted to 15 persons today.
By late afternoon it was still impossible to establish communication with Manteo, county seat of Dare county, located on Roanoke Island, from where radio calls for help were received late Sunday.
A radio station on the island sought immediate assistance but static made reception of the calls almost impossible and extent of damage could not be determined.
Partial List Of Dead.
Word reached here late Sunday from stricken areas that had been isolated since Friday night, that four men on a barge had drowned in Albemarle sound, while three girls and a woman lost their lives in Carteret county (Beaufort).
A partial list of the dead:
Two young daughters of ELIJAH DIXON, of Merrimon.
The 17 year old daughter of HERBIE CARRAWAY, of Merrimon.
MRS. ELLA DELMAR, 51, of South River.
Two white men and two negroes as yet unidentified.
A sailor who was washed off the motorship Sun, and a negro fisherman who was drowned near Nag's Head.
An eleventh person, a negro coast guardsman, was reported missing.
Flood Waters Fatal.
Water rose to a height of 16 feet in the Merrimon community 20 miles from here. The DIXON family sought refuge in an upper story of their home, but the building was swept into Back Creek, DIXON, his wife, and young son clung to wreckage until rescued 24 hours later.
The two young girls were swept to their death.
CARRAWAY'S daughter was crushed beneath a razed house.
MRS. DELMAR drowned when South River overflowed.
The four men on a lumber barge were thrown into the water when their craft upset. The negroes bodies were found, but the white men had not been located.
Meanwhile, late reports from Kitty Hawk and Nag's Head indicated that inhabitants had abandoned their homes which had been buffeted by the hurricane late Friday and early Saturday.
Millions of Dollars Damage.
Reports of damage mounted as more sections were heard from today and is expected to amount to millions of dollars.
At Elizabeth City, the sale of kerosene lamps boomed at a lively rate when electric power was shut off to prevent possible electrocutions from faulty insulation or other defects.
In Carteret county alone damage was expected to exceed $1,000,000. It had been cut off from communication with the rest of the state since Friday night, and first reports trickled out late Sunday.
The storm center also struck New Bern and Craven county, and Pamlico county, all near here, causing millions of dollars damage to property, merchants goods and crops, and washing away the $300,000 Neuse river bridge at New Bern.
Storm damage in the Elizabeth City area was comparatively small, being confined chiefly to uprooted trees, damaged communications and disrupted power service.
Wires from Elizabeth City to Dare county and Roanoke island, where great damage and suffering is feared, were snapped early Saturday and traffic to Nag's Head and Manteo was said to have been halted just beyond the Wright Memorial bridge by several washouts in that already badly damaged beach highway.
Red Cross Spreads Relief.
Meanwhile, Red Cross workers pushed into the storm area to spread relief among thousands of persons who lost their homes or who were injured and many who were hungry and needed medical attention.
The Red Cross opened emergency relief headquarters at Morehead City, Beaufort and Atlantic, all in Carteret county. A coast guard boat was dispatched to Hatteras village, near Cape Hatteras, with food and clothing requested by fishing villages of the island. Another boat carried supplies to Salter Path across the sound from Morehead City.
Reports were awaited anxiously from Ocracoke island, another point on the storm-torn sandy outer banks which run up the coast from Carteret county to Virginia.
MRS. THOMAS O'BERRY, of Goldsboro, state director of relief, visited New Bern and after an inspection tour announced whatever federal money is needed for relief will be made available.
Red Cross and local relief agencies will expend the federal funds.
The New Bern-Morehead City highway had been cleared of debris by highway workers who pushed on through here and towards Atlantic farther up the coast where state highway No. 10, the main street of North Carolina, ends at the sea.
Damage Widespread.
All along the outer banks, new channels and inlets were cut thru by the hurricane-whipped seas.
It is reported that the Nag's Head beach highway was under water for 10 miles.
New Bern reported that 55 out of the 165 spans washed away from the Neuse river bridge had been located and anchored, and that highway workers were searching for the others.
Twenty people, including several babies, were marooned in a tobacco barn near Oriental all Saturday night, MRS. O'BERRY reported. Oriental is in Pamilco county. Water in the barn often reached a depth of several feet and mothers had to hold their babies over their heads to prevent them from drowning.
From many sources came reports of harrowing experiences, of persons being marooned for almost 23 hours while high water almost took their homes away.

The Daily Times-News Burlington North Carolina 1933-09-18