Camp Lejeune, NC Helicopter Crash, Nov 1984

CH-53_Super_Stallion.jpg

SIX MARINES DIE IN COPTER CRASH.

Camp Lejeune, N.C. (AP) -- It will take four to six months to determine what caused on on the Marines' newest and largest helicopters to burst into flames and crash, killing six servicemen and injuring 11 others, including two from Pennsylvania, a Marine spokesman said.
Capt. Dave Winston, aviation safety officer for Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 464, said it would take four to six months to determine what caused the fire and crash of the CH-53E Super Stallion Monday afternoon.
Seventeen soldiers were aboard the huge helicopter when it caught fire and hit the ground Monday afternoon while lifting a heavy artilery piece, a 155mm howitzer.
Rescuers found three of the dead Monday and the other three Tuesday morning, said Capt. Norma Stewart of New River Air Station.
The burned and mangled wreckage was surrounded by guards Tuesday. The helicopter was broken in two, with the rear section twisted and one engine lying on the ground. The rotors were snapped off.
Bits of burned debris were scattered around the flat landing zone, and the howitzer the helicopter was lifting sat upright, but tilted.
Camp Lejeune spokesman Capt. Craig Fisher said some of the 11 injured suffered bruised internal organs, but "most are fractured bones, arms and legs. People are in serious condition, but the prognosis is good."
Five of the six dead were identified as:
BRIAN R. JONES, 32, of Harlan, Iowa.
Lance Cpl. SCOTT A. McENEANY, 23, of Fairport, N.Y.
Pfc. KEVIN J. KAISER, 19, of Kenmore, N.Y.
Cpl. RICKY C. WILLIAMS, 23, of Sumter, S.C.
Lance Cpl. DAVID D. WELLS, 22, of Salem, Ind.
Fisher later said WILLIAMS and WELLS were listed as presumed dead because no positive identification had been made.
JONES was identified as the helicopter pilot and McENEANY as a member of the flight crew. The others were members of B Battery, 1st Battaliion, 10th Marine Regiment.
The injured Marines were taken to the U.S. Naval Hospital on base, Lt. S. B. Jack said.

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Comments

19 nov 84 lz penquin crash

I was the co's driver that day i was on the advanced party that day. I had just been dropped by your fathers bird in a jeep. I was 100 feet away when he flew back into position with the first howitzer. I have pictures of the opetations that day. I was also one of the marines that tried to free the capt from his seat with ssgt nye. Contact. Me at 309 620 5858 or anyone their that day. Semper Fi

Scott McEneany

Hi..I just Googled Scott's name, and found this thread...I wasn't even aware that it existed...I was involved with Scott on and off for a few years before this tragedy..I was with him the weekend before he died when he came home on the fly (I believe that was meant to be by God)...I just visited his grave again 2 weeks ago...unspeakable tragedy for his family---anything at all that you remember about him, the accident, etc would be cherished..God bless you and keep you - Kelley

remembering

Hi Bob (Santa Cruz ) Hughes. The past few days I've been thinking about that awful day. One of my son's is leaving for boot camp next week, maybe that's why I'm thinking about that day. 19 Nov 1984. If I remember correctly, we were in a MCRES, Marine Combat Readiness Evaluation. The Morning of the drill was beautiful. What I remember is we had successfully performed our mission of moving the Guns from one landing zone to another, laying the Guns and being set up to fire. We made the time hacks no problem. Everybody seemed happy. We were all in good mood, eating our mre's then the word came down we were going to do it again. The weather had begun to change. It was a sunny morning but while we were eating it became overcast and windy. I believe it was Jeff Stidham who mentioned that we shouldn't be going back up with those winds. As we waited in defensive position's for the 53's to come in, Zulu order was given Guns 3 and 4 would go first. In the Morning we were in Alpha order Guns 1 and 2 went first.We were the last lift. As we were heading for the the landing zone I remember the 53 crew chief disconecting his safety lanyard and moving quickly to the window between Bob Hughes and Myself. We knew there was a problem. The Crew chief finally told us another 53 had crashed. We stayed in the air for another 10 or 15 minutes before we touched down. It might have been longer. We all wanted to land. As we got off the 53 we grabbed what ever equipment we had and ran to tree line. Bob you and I were carrying the tool box. I remember looking at the wreckage and seeing black smoke we were at least 300 yds away and I think most of us were in shock, couldn't believe it. The next day we went to the field to fire the 05's. Everybody was pissed, but every body did their job. We did what we were expected to do. Most of us went home for Thanksgiving the following day. Worst 96 ever. Semper Fi Dennis O'Connor Bravo 1/10

CH-53 mishap

I was in in HMH-464 when the Helicopter went down..it was a sad day for HMH-464 ,,, Your Dad was a good pilot ,,it was a design fail that caused the mishap...

19 NOV 1984

I am the daughter of Capt Brian Jones. I can't explain why I haven't googled the crash before now, but I did today. I was 9 on that day and not a day has gone by that I don't wonder what happened. My mother has since passed, also. I would greatly appreciate any information that can be given. I think of everyone involved often and would like to thank the men on the ground and the survivors for their actions and service. I had no idea a thread like this existed. God Bless all of you and Semper Fi!

I just saw your post. I'll

I just saw your post. I'll call you tomorrow.
Terri

CH 53 Crash Nov 19 1984

Cpl. Ricky C Williams and I were friends. I was also in Romeo Btry 5/10 and went to Battalion later. I was present during the aftermath and will never forget the smell from the crash. I recall speaking with Ricky and he wanted me to get him out of the field. That thought remains in my mind. I wonder if he had a premonition of something wrong about to happen. RC Williams will forever be in my mind. I don't live to far from Sumter, SC. [email protected]

Keith Murchison
NC DHHS
Former Romeo 5/10

Bravo battery

I was in bravo at that time on gun 4. I will never forget shaking pfc kaiser hand that morning when Sgt to hill introduced us and said he was replacing me so I could go to my classes. Tohill and wells had taught me so much the few weeks that I knew them that training in the classes was a breeze. I will never forget those guys and I have wondered about the survivors a lot over the years. You guys feel free to call 9013613901

teri huntley call me 330 234

teri huntley call me 330 234 3012 anyone want to contact me feel free

I remember that day

I stayed back at the barracks that day. SGT Tohill
gave me an old school camouflage top just before the flight.
I also remember that Lcpl Wells gave his drivers license to
someone, I forget who, just before the flight.
Very sad day.

[email protected]