Titanic Sinking - Cargo Onboard

CARGO OF TITANIC VALUED AT $420,000

Merchandise of Every Kind Went to the Bottom with Giant Liner.

ALL HIGH-CLASS FREIGHT

Tiffany, Claflin, Lazard Brothers, the Barings, and the Express Companies Among the Consigners.

The full list of freight and express cargo on the White Star liner Titanic when that vessel went down last Monday morning was received in New York Friday in the registered mail of the Cunarder Mauretania. The manifest shows a cargo the value of which is conservatively estimated at about $420,000.

The weight of the cargo was about 1,400 tons, not a large amount, all things considered, until it is remembered that cargo was a secondary matter so far as the Titanic was concerned. That ship was built for high-priced passengers and what little cargo she carried was also of the kind that demanded quick transportation. The Titanic's freight was for the most part what is known as high-class package freight.

Among the consignees of the Titanic's cargo were Tiffany & Co., whose consignment was silver goods; H. B. Claflin Company, Baring Brothers Company, the American Express Company, the United States Express Company, Lazard Freres, Austin Nichols & Co., Acker, Merrall & Condit Co., Alfred Suter, A. G. Spalding & Bro., the Spencerian Pen Company, B. Altman & Co., F. R. Arnold & Co., Adams Express Company, and Wells-Fargo Express Company.

Among the cargo listed with food stuffs, liquors and machinery were:

"...pens, laces, gloves, orchids, tulle, printers' blankets, cotton laces, bulbs, brushware, furniture, leathers, silk crape, soap perfumes, parchments, hosiery, books, plants, beams, canvases, gramaphones, films, lace collars, shells, rubber, woolens, linoleum, gum, sponges, periodicals, tennis balls, instruments, photos, golf balls, paints, hair nets, clothing, sundries, velvets, coney skins, raw feathers, rabbit hair, ribbons, opium, jute bagging, goat skins, grandfather clocks, raw silk, hatter's fur, horse hair, window frames, etc..."

The cargo consisted of high-class freight, which had to be taken quickly on board and which could be just as quickly discharged. The articles were such as fine laces, ostrich feathers, wines, liquors, and fancy food commodities.

The New York Times, New York, NY 21 Apr 1912