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Dayton, NV Fire, Jul 1870

Nevada.

Special to the Bulletin.

Appalling Fire at Dayton-Forty-Five Buildings Destroyed-Business Portion of the Place Burned.

The following private dispatch was received this morning by Hope, McKillip & Co., of this city:
Virginia, July 19.-An appalling fire occurred last night in Dayton. Forty-five buildings have been burned, and the business portion of the place is destroyed.

Virginia City Matter-The Dayton Fire.

Virginia, July 19.-A destructive fire occurred last night, about 9 o’clock, in Dayton, which destroyed 39 frame buildings and six brick. Almost the entire business portion of the town is burnt.

San Francisco Bulletin, San Francisco, CA 19 Jul 1870

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Nevada.

Special to the Bulletin.
The Fire at Dayton-A Clean Sweep-List of Buildings Destroyed.

Silver City, July 19.-8 p.m.-The town of Dayton was all destroyed by fire last night. The fire started at 10 o’clock at night in an unoccupied building next to Pinschowers. The following business houses were destroyed: Norton’s saloon, Frank’s carpenter shop, Smith’s restaurant, Benham & Bros., the Post office, Pinschower Bros. dry goods, Carling’s saloon, Brant’s variety store, Davis’ restaurant, O’Malley’s drug store, the Telegraph Office, Seaton’s grocery, Fisher’s brewery, Pratt & Shaw’s hay-yard, Gruber, the Lyon’s House, Cross’ national Hotel, Kean’s dry goods, Gouldin, barber; Hamilton’s livery stable, the Franklin House, Franklin Saddler, Higgs tailor, Migdley’s boarding house, Byron & Crocket, Odeon Hall and several smaller buildings.
San Francisco Bulletin, San Francisco, CA 20 Jul 1870

Fifty-two buildings were destroyed by the fire at Dayton last evening. Estimated loss, $110,000; insured for $35,000.

San Francisco Bulletin, San Francisco, CA 20 Jul 1870

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The Great Fire at Dayton-Fifty Buildings Burned-Total loss $100,000.

The fire at Dayton on the 18th inst., says the Virginia City (Nev.) Enterprise of July 20th, proves to have been most destructive. Nearly the whole of the business portion of the town was laid in ashes:

The fire originated in an unoccupied saloon-a frame structure building-belonging to M.H. Webb. The fire started in the upper story of this building, and was bursting through the roof when first discovered, at 9 o’clock. There was a light wind from the southwest, and the flames soon extended to other wooden buildings adjoining. The alarm was at once given, but there being no fire engine in the town or organized fire company of any kind, great confusion prevailed, and the fire spread rapidly, leaping from house to house, and in its swift progress allowing no time for the removal of goods. There was an abundance of water in the town, but the fire soon became so intensely hot that it was impossible to get near it with buckets. Goods that had been removed from houses in advance of the fire, kindled, and were consumed where they lay heaped up in the streets. From the point where it originated the fire swept along Main Street in the direction of the river, and before its progress was stayed four whole blocks of buildings were in ruins, it was only by pulling down buildings that the fire could be checked, but, after all, it took pretty much its own course, s may well be conceived when the facilities at command for combating it are taken into consideration. We are indebted to Sheriff Cummings of this place, and Dr. Hazlett of Dayton, for the following list of sufferers, with the losses they severally sustained:

M. Meyer, $1,700; Allen & Co., $600;-Midgely $1,100; A.J. Markwill, $1,000; Mrs. Howard, $500; Brandt & Co.$3,200; J. Mankton, $1,500; Byrom & Johnson, $1,000; Telegraph Company, $500; F. Wyatt, $500; Haynes & Traub, $300; W. Norton, $1,000; J. Paulson, $600; J.P. Dallam, $600; Borhom & Bro., $1,200; R.M. Nickerson, $1,000; H. Webb, $800; F. Walter, $800; P. Carlin, $3,300; J.W. Davis, $1,000; H. Fisher, $6,300; W. Kean & Co., $23,000; I.D. Cross, $14,000; J.C. Gruber, $6,000; Byrom & Crockett, $16,000; Clark & Seaton, $4,600; Pinchower & Bro., $17,500; R. O’Malley, $5,000; Tom Smith, $500; P. Cohn, $100; F. Birdsall, $100; G.O. Howe, $150; J.C. Hazlett, $100; D.C. Fox, $600; Pratt & Shaw, $3,000; J. L. Campbell, $700; N.C. Power, $200; J.C. Franklin, $4,800; S.C. Hamilton, $2,000; J.P. Bause, $1,000; J. Winzell, $2,500; cords of wood, $1,500. Six brick buildings, supposed to be fireproof, were destroyed, the fire curling up the iron doors, and sweeping into and through them. Odeon Hall shared the fate of the majority of the fireproofs. But a small proportion of the total loss was covered by insurance. The whole amount of insurance upon property destroyed is $39,000, divided among the following companies: Northern Insurance Company, $5,000; Manhattan and Phoenix Companies, $11,500; Aetna Insurance Company, $4,205; North British and Mercantile, $8,500; People’s Insurance Company, $2,000; Fireman’s Fund, $5,000; Pacific, $3,000. Many families are left without homes and in a destitute condition-all having been swept away. Such a clean sweep was make of the provisions in the town that hardly enough was left to feed the people. Then all their stoves and cooking utensils were destroyed, making it a matter of still greater difficulty to feed the multitude. The fire is supposed to have been kindled by an incendiary, as the building in which it started has long been unoccupied.

San Francisco Bulletin, San Francisco, CA 22 Jul 1870

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After a Fire.

The Territorial Enterprise, (Virginia, Nevada.) says; Persons who have visited Dayton since the late great fire say that the town presents a most melancholy appearance. The destruction of four whole blocks in the best part of the town is a sad loss to a place the size of Dayton. Although a good deal cast down, the Daytonites are not altogether disheartened. They are beginning to rake about in the ashes of their late homes and places of business with the thoughts of rebuilding-some few, indeed, have already commenced putting up new buildings. A correspondent informs us that they have an abundance of provisions in the town, enough to last for months, and that no one has yet suffered or is likely to suffer for food. They say they will be able to take care of the destitute of the town without assistance from their neighbors. For all this is will be long before Dayton is the same handsome and flourishing town it was previous to the fire. The people of Dayton should at once organize a fire company and procure a good engine. Water they have in abundance. It may appear like locking the stable after the disappearance of its equine occupant, but so it seemed after the great fire three years ago.

The New York Times, New York, NY 30 Jul 1870



article | by Dr. Radut