Boston, MA Famous Aviatrix Killed, July 1912

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MISS QUIMBY AND PASSENGER FALL TO DEATH IN OCEAN.

AEROPLANE TIPS THEM OUT ONE THOUSAND FEET ABOVE CROWDED BEACH.

5,000 WITNESS TRAGEDY.

MISS SCOTT OF ROCHESTER, FLYING ABOVE ILL-FATED AIRCRAFT, IS UNSTRUNG BY THE ACCIDENT AND BARELY REACHES THE EARTH IN SAFETY.

Boston, July 2 -- The deaths in the science of aviation was increased by two souls shortly after 6 o'clock last evening, when MISS HARRIET QUIMBY of New York, premiere aviatrice of this continent, the first woman, to operate a heavier than air machine across the English channel and first to win a pilot's license under the rules of the Aero Club of America, and WILLIAM A. F. WILLARD of this city, manager of the third meet on the Harvard Field and father of Charles Foster Willard, the Curtiss flyer, were hurled a thousand feet into Dorchester Bay from MISS QUIMBY'S Blariot of the most recent war type and instantly killed.
Miss Blanche Scott of Rochester, who was flying directly above MISS QUIMBY, was so unstrung by witnessing the tragedy that she partially lost control of her machine, narrowly escaping death.
Instantly an admiring, applauding gathering of more than 6,000 people was thrown into a hysterical mob. Women shrieked and men jumped from their seats in a mad frenzy. Instantly the orderly stands were a seething mass as the crowds jumped to their feet and made effort to rush to the western edge of the field on Dorchester Bay, where the bodies had been seen to catapult into the bay about twenty feet from the shore.
Their onward rush was checked by a troop of cavalry who have been assisting in the policing of the field and the only persons allowed near the scene were those participating or having actual connection with the meet.
The staff of field surgeons were rushed towards the scene in automobiles, for at that time it was thought that there might be opportunity to do something for the unfortunate pair. They arrived to find their services useless, for on first reaching the edge of the field there was no trace of the bodies.
From the Savin Hill Yacht Club, a fleet of motor boats rushed out and raced to the scene with the motors chugging at a racing speed. They came to the spot where the bodies had seemed to vanish and instantly three within them leaped overboard and dove into the four feet of water to search.
A second later the two floated to the surface and were gently borne to the shore and laid out on Squanium Head, where Dr. George F. Sheahan, the field surgeon, and his three assistants began an immediate examination. Both were dead and in the opinions of the doctors they were dead before they struck the water. Numerous cuts and bruises covered each, and there was many crushed bones.
MISS QUIMBY'S face bore no cuts, but from a deep gash over WILLARD'S eye blood flowed freely. Ambulances that arrived within a few minutes were pressed into service to carry the bodies to the morgue in Quincy, where the medical examiner from the district will perform his post mortem examination tomorrow.

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