Oakland, MD train wreck, Mar 1897

GEN. J. S. FULLERTON MET SUDDEN DEATH IN A TRAIN WRECK.

CAR HE OCCUPIED PLUNGED FROM A BRIDGE NEAR OAKLAND, MD.

BODY NOT YET RECOVERED.

A DOZEN OTHER PASSENGERS - MANY FROM THE WEST - RECIEVED INJURIES.

THE NEWS IN ST. LOUIS.

REPUBLIC SPECIAL.

Cumberland, Md., March 20. - The east-bound B & O express was wrecked on the Youghlogheny Bridge, near Oakland, Md., within a few minutes of 8 o'clock this morning, by an engine heaving the rails while moving at a rapid rate. General J. B. Fullerton of St. Louis was killed. His body had not been recovered up to a late hour to-night.

The killed:

GENERAL J. B. FULLERTON of St. Louis; supposed to be buried under the wreckage of a Pullman car now lying in the river.

The injured:

M. D. PHELPS, chief engineer of the Fire Department, Barre, Vt.; internally hurt and bruised shoulder.
MRS. ANNA PHELPS, his wife; hand cut, face and mouth bruised.
J. KNIGHT THOMPSON, Baltimore; slight scalp wound.
J. D. KUPPENHEIMER, New York; three slight scalp wounds.
MRS. JEMIMA HUSTON, Davis, W. Va.; general shock.
W. R. TELLER, a Pullman conductor; right side seriously injured.
C. D. DAVIS, United States mail weigher; slightly injured.
C. B. MARTIN, Salina, Kas.; arm slightly injured.
MRS. JAMES HANLIN, carpenter, Ohio; nervous shock.
J. N. RICHARDS, Fort Scott, Kas.; neck and back sprained.
G. H. SANDERS, Alaska, W. Va.; scratched about the head and face.
A. R. JACKSON, Climax Springs, Mo.; sprained back.

The Kansas gentlemen were en route to Washington. The injured were brought to Cumberland. The most badly hurt were taken to the Western Maryland Hospital, where their wounds were dressed.

The train was more than an hour late. The flange of the engine rode the rail 40 feet before dropping on the outside of the track. The rear passenger coach and the sleeper Ukraine were thrown over the bridge, the Ukraine turning over several times in the descent. The car was completely demolished and fell with its truck up in the river. The bridge is about 20 feet above the water. The passenger coach was thrown on its side near the river bank, but did not go into the river. The track was torn up for several hundred yards. It is almost miraculous that the entire train did not fall into the river.

Personal telegrams from the scene of the wreck place the death of General Fullerton beyond a doubt. The first news received in St. Louis was a telegram forwarded by a man named Moore, a companion on the journey, with General Fullerton, to Loyal Legion friends saying the body was missing, followed by later ones saying there was no hope whatever and to notify his relatives.

General Joseph B. Fullerton was born 60 years ago at Chillicothie [sic], O. He had distinguished family connections. Mrs. Benjamin Harrison and Mrs. Rutherford B. Hayes were first cousins of his.

A curious incident occurred to General Fullerton before he left this city on his fatal trip. In purchasing his ticket in St. Louis, he and J. M. Simpson, Chairman of the Republican State Committee of Kansas, through some mistake, received tickets for the same berth. General Fullerton was somewhat piqued, and Mr. Simpson offered to surrender the berth, but the Pullman conductor told General Fullerton that he would give him the best berth in the train, in the front sleeper, which offer the General accepted, at the time saying he did not care to ride in the rear sleeper. This was the sleeper that carried him to his death.

The Saint Louis Republic, Saint Louis, MO, 21 Mar 1897