Ocean City, MD Boat Capsizing, Aug 1895

NOT ONE WAS LEFT.

AN ENTIRE FAMILY WIPED OUT BY A BOATING DISASTER.

SEVEN WERE DROWNED BY THE SUDDEN CAPSIZING OF A SMALL PLEASURE CRAFT.

PANIC CAUSED THE HORROR.

BODIES OF ALL BUT TWO OF THE YOUNG LADIES RECOVERED.

Ocean City, Md., Aug. 18. -- By the overloading of a small pleasure boat an entire family was drowned and two other families are in mourning. A party of farmers from the neighborhood of Frankford and Selbyville, Del., had a fish fry on Grey's Creek, a branch of the Isle of Wight Bay, with bathing, fishing and amusements. WILLIAM HUDSON carried a party of nine out sailing, and as the boat was about to come back, the women of the party jumped screaming on the high side, capsizing the little craft, which was hardly large enough to carry five persons.
The following seven were drowned:
WILLIAM STORR, aged forty-five years, Philadelphia.
LANRA STORR, his wife, aged thirty-five.
IDA STORR, aged sixteen.
MAY STORR, aged fourteen.
MYRTLE STEVENS, aged sixteen, a daughter of Joshua Stevens, of Selbyville.
LINA HALL, aged nineteen.
LULU HALL, aged fourteen, the daughters of Elisha Hall, of near Frankford.
The capsizing occurred within 200 yards of the shore and in water seven feet deep. MR. STORR had only one hand and was blind in one eye, but was an expert swimmer. He succeeded in getting his two daughters on the bottom of the boat and was getting his wife, when the girls became scared and slipped off of the boat and went to their parents, and together the four perished. HUDSON, who was sailing the boat, got the two HALL girls on the boat, and was trying to save MISS STEVENS, when they slipped off and were drowned before he could get to them. The other ladies who were in the boat were rescued by a fisherman who put off from the shore as the boat capsized. MR. STOOR was found shortly after his family, and MISS STEVENS body was found today by hauling a seine. Large parties are searching for the bodies of the other two.
The STORRS family resided at 4919 Lancaster Avenue, Philadelphia. MR. STORRS was married in this neighborhood and yearly brought his family down for a two weeks' outing. They were very fond of aquatic sports and spent most of their time boating and fishing. HUDSON, the skipper, protested to MR. STORRS against the party crowding into his small boat, which could only carry comfortably four persons. STORRS answered: "Oh, there is no danger. The water is shallow; we are close to shore and the wind is light."
The bodies, when recovered today by the searching parties, presented a horrible sight, particularly that of MRS. STORRS. Crabs had eaten the flesh from her face, exposing her teeth and even the roots of her tongue. The ends of the fingers of all had been eaten away, and their eyes had disappeared.
Before entering the boat, MRS. STORRS took her husband's gold watch, over a hundred dollars in money and their rings and other valuables and tied them in her apron. She was tightly clutching the bundle in death.

St. Paul Daily Globe Minnesota 1895-08-19