College Park, MD Two Aviators Killed, June 1912

Arthur Welsh picture 1908.jpg Arthur Welsh at the controls 1906.jpg

AEROPLANE DIPS; TWO ARE KILLED.

ARMY AVIATOR'S NECK BROKEN IN TRIAL TRIP.

INSTRUCTOR'S SKULL CRUSHED.

LEIGHTON W. HAZELHURST, JR., OF GEORGIA AND A. L. WELSH OF WRIGHT SCHOOL MEET SUDDEN DEATHS AT COLLEGE PARK, MD., ON TENTH TEST OF NEW MACHINE -- NINE FIRST TESTS WERE PRONOUNCED SUCCESS -- LIEUTENANT CONSIDERED BRIGHT PUPIL.

Washington, June 12. -- While testing a new Wright biplane at College Park, Md., Lieutenant LEIGHTON W. HAZELHURST, JR., an army aviator, and ALBERT W. WELSH, a professional flyer, were dashed to death from a height of 50 feet while the machine was going about 50 miles an hour. It suddenly pitched forward and the occupants were hurled to the ground. When spectators reached the scene of the accident it was found that both men were dead. Lieutenant
HAZELHURST'S neck was broken and WELSH'S
skull was crushed. The machine was badly shattered.
The cause of the accident is unknown, though it is believed that some of the supporting wires between the planes snapped suddenly and caused it to plunge forward. An investigation will be held today to determine the cause of the accident.
The death of Lieutenant HAZELHURST is the third that has occurred among the army aviators.
Lieutenant Thomas C. Selfridge was killed at Fort Myer in a Wright biplane in September, 1908, and Lieutenant John Kelly was killed at San Antonio, Tex., in March, 1911.
Aviator WELSH had been at College Park for several days demonstrating a new Wright biplane to the army aviators. Under the regulations the machine was required to meet 10 rigid tests. Nine of these requirements had been successfully met and WELSH, with Lieutenant HAZELHURST as his passenger, was on the tenth test when the machine collapsed and pitched the men to the earth.

Van Wert Daily Bulletin Ohio 1912-06-12