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Clinton, KY Tornado, Jan 1890

SUNDAY'S GREAT STORM.

AWFUL WORK OF THE WIND AT CLINTON, KENTUCKY.

SEVENTY BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

BURYING THE UNFORTUNATE INMATES IN THE RUINS -- TEN PERSONS CRUSHED AND MANGLED TO DEATH, WHILE FIFTY OTHERS ARE SUFFERING FROM THEIR INJURIES.

CLinton, Ky., Jan. 14. -- A few minutes after 6 o'clock Sunday evening a tornado struck this town, destroying seventy buildings, killing ten persons and wounding fifty, several of whom are so badly injured that they cannot survive. The usual tornadic phenomena were observed an hour before the twister arrived. The temperature was warm, and there were several dangerous-looking clouds in the south.
A short thunder storm set in, and then up from the south came the funnel-shaped cloud, sweeping everything before it. The dwelling houses here are nearly all constructed of wood, and a number of them were lifted from their foundations and dashed asunder against the ground. A path a block wide was cut clear through the western portion of the city, but, fortunately, the main residence district escaped.
The wind crossed main street and razed a number of stores, the second floors of which were occupied as dwellings. Scarcely three minutes was consumed in the work of destruction. Then the air was filled with the cries of the wounded, and the whole adult population turned out and began rescuing the living and caring for the dead.
List of the dead are:
J. A. RHODES.
PETER RHODES.
JOHN RHODES.
MRS. WILLIAM BONE.
BURNETT BONE.
JOHN W. GADDIE.
An Infant of Judge E. C. HODGE.
WALTER NANCE.
An Infant of J. W. GADDIE.
W. R. NANCE.
The injured, who are not expected to recover, are:
MRS. J. A. RHODES and Child.
ROBERT JOHNSON and Son.
J. R. GRAHAM, wife and two children.
Judge E. C. HODGES.
Those who are believed to have a chance for their lives are:
MRS. J. W. GADDIE and Child.
G. R. GWINN.
MRS. G. R. GWINN.
C. W. VORHEES and family of five.
MRS. HODGES.
Rev. N. W. LITTLE, wife and two children.
A. F. JUSTIS, wife and child.
WILLIAM BONE and four children.
D. STUBLEFIELD, wife and four children.
MRS. FOSTER and two children.
Five members of J. R. GRAHAM'S family.
J. P. NICHOLS, wife and three children.
All these people are suffering with cuts, bruises, broken limbs and internal injuries.
The tornado swept away everything in its path on both sides of town. The tall iron chimney on the flour mill was torn from its fastenings and carried a considerable distance away. The Baptist church steeple was blown over, falling on the roof and breaking through with a crash.
A number of freight cars which stood on the tracks of the New Orleans, St. Louis and Chicago road were turned over, and a pile of lumber was scattered like straw. The loss is estimated at $50,000, and it is thought the town can get along without outside help. A committee is actively seeking aid, and has so far collected $1,000. This will be used to promptly help the destitute.
A partial list of the damages is as follows:
J. R. GRAHAM, $3,000.
J. W. NANCE, $1,000.
W. F. BOONE, $2,000.
E. R. GWINNE, $1,000.
J. V. NANCE, $1,000.
C. V. VORHEES, $700.
A. F. JUSTIS, $1,000.
J. W. GADDIE, $2,500.
MRS. M. A. TAYLOR, $1,000.
W. I. RUDD, $500.
J. W. HUDSON, $500.
D. STUBBLEFIELD, $1,000.
ROBERT JOHNSON, $2,000.
MRS. R. S. FOSTER, $500.
ED SUBLETTE, $1,000.
R. L. ANTHONY, $500.
N. W. LITTLE, $500.
The sufferers can ill afford their losses, as they represent about all of their possessions. The public buildings, hotels and houses of citizens are thrown open to the injured. Mayor HALLIDAY, of Cairo, sent four physicians from that place, and they rendered all possible aid to the wounded.
Offers of aid by telegraph have been received from outside points, and the question of accepting will be decided by the committee.

Newark Daily Advocate Ohio 1890-01-14



article | by Dr. Radut