Plymouth, Emporia, Neva, KS Tornadoes, May 1910

KANSAS TOWN IS SWEPT BY TORNADO.

RAIN AND WINDSTORMS CAUSE DAMAGE IN WEST.

Topeka, Kan., May 3. -- The village of Plymouth, six miles southwest of Emporia, is reported to have been badly damaged by a tornado. Plymouth is a small town with 400 population on the Santa Fe railroad. All wires are down.
Severe rain and windstorms, reaching almost to tornado proportions at some points are reported from towns in eastern and central Kansas and western Missouri. What is described as a small tornado swept over Emporia, Kan., cutting off telephone and telegraph service.
Trainmen on the east bound California limited on the Santa Fe, on arrival here, reported a violent hailstorm at Neva, Kan. Telegraph poles, they said, were blown down and hail broke the windows of two of the cars.

Oelwein Daily Register Iowa 1910-05-03

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Plymouth, KS Tornado, May 1910

Topeka, Kas., May 2.--It is reported that the village of Plymouth six miles southwest of Emporia, was entirely destroyed by a tornado Sunday night. Plymouth is a small town with 400 population on the Santa Fe railway. The tornado, which struck the western section of Emporia unroofed several houses and carried one off its foundation, a large cow barn was crushed like an egg shell and several smaller barns were blown away. No one was killed or injured.

The Santa Fe reports that the wind destroyed the telegraph lines between Emporia and Hutchinson, which is where the storm was most severe. A force of men is at work on the lines and they are expected to be in working order by noon. Trains are being run west as usual with the assistance of the block signals.

Reno Evening Gazette, Reno, NV 2 May 1910

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In Plymouth a great number of dwellings were unroofed or else demolished completely and many small barns were blown away, but no one so far as learned were killed or injured.

The wind blew down telegraph poles and uprooted trees. A tornado struck the outskirts of Emporia last night an destroyed several small houses but it is believed no lives were lost.

The Daily Journal, Telluride, Co 2 May 1910