Hutchinson, KS Tornado, May 1927

TORNADO'S TOLL REMAINS AT TEN.

TWENTY INJURED IN SUNDAY STORM WILL RECOVER -- RELIEF WORK PROGRESSES.

HUTCHINSON HARDEST HIT.

HOMELESS ARE BEING PROVIDED FOR -- CITY'S PROPERTY LOSS IS ESTIMATED HALF MILLION.

Hutchinson, May 9 (AP) -- The death list in Saturday night's tornado which struck four central Kansas counties will probably remain at 10. Reports from the hospitals today where 20 storm victims are still undergoing treatment indicate all will recover. Several have severe injuries.
Hutchinson suffered heaviest in property damage but escaped with but one killed. HENRY STROUSE, 35, fireman at the Carey salt plant, was killed when the boiler room collapsed.
Four deaths occurred in the path of the storm extending about 10 miles north of Hutchinson into the south edge of McPherson county. They were:
BUFORD JOHNSON, 60, Negro farmer and preacher, and his six year old grandson.
H. H. TOEWS, farmer, crushed in the collapse of his home.
The 6-months-old son of DR. and MRS. J. J. GOERTZEN, was found in a wheat field a mile from home, which was completely destroyed. DR. and MRS. GOERTZEN received internal injuries and are amont the most seriously injured at the local hospitals.
Five were killed in Barber and Kingman counties where the first tornado struck early Saturday night.
They are:
MRS. MAUCK, wife of a farmer living near Nashville.
DEAN WILLIAMSON, 5, son of MR. and MRS. BERNARD WILLIAMSON, near Kingman.
FRANK COFFMAN, farmer, near Medicine Lodge.
MR. and MRS. GUY SAYERS, near Medicine Lodge.
Relief work was taking definite form today. Temporary shelter was provided during the night for the homeless of Hutchinson and relatives and neighbors cared for the homeless in the country north of here. WIre connections have not been fully rehabilitated to the southwest.
The Hutchinson Red Cross started a subscription list to aid local sufferers and will assist farmers to the north of here in financing rebuilding. Less than half the farmers carried tornado insurance.
The loss in Hutchinson including approximately one-half million dollars to east end industrial plants will be in the neighborhood of a million dollars and to the farming community north of here about a quarter of a million. Thousands of fine apple trees were uprooted in the sand hill country traversed by the twister.

The Emporia Gazette Kansas 1927-05-09