Elmo, IA Tornado, May 1903

Blanchard, Ia., May 26.---A tornado struck Elmo, eight miles west of Blanchard, just across the Missouri line this afternoon, destroying the town. Nine persons were killed, and a number injured.

C. C. CALHOUN.
CASHIUS BELL.
J. J. ALVIS.
LEONARD BRADLEY.
MINTON HUFF.
GUS HUFF.
OREN STRANGLER.
D. L. STARKER.
GEORGE PERRY.

The killed and injured were all in the store in the Masonic Temple building, when it was demolished. Some of the injured may die. Only a few buildings in the town are left standing. The fate of the occupants of some of the dwellings destroyed is not known, and it is feared there are more fatalities. A deluge of rain followed the tornado.

Decatur Herald, Decatur, IL 27 May 1903

--------

Two Reported Dead.

Gray, Audubon County, May 27.----A most destructive and fatal tornado struck the town of Elmo, Mo., eight miles south of Blanchard and just across the Missouri state line last evening.

Nine person were killed outright and five were injured, some of whom may die.

The storm came from the northeast and first struck the Wabash depot The Masonic temple was the next building in its path and it was demolished. On the lower floor of the temple was located a general merchandise store, and in the store was gathered a number of the citizens of the town. The building was torn to pieces before any warning was received and the victims were buried beneath the wreckage.

Of the fourteen persons in the store only five escaped death and these received injuries which in two or three cases may prove fatal.

Throughout the town but few buildings were left standing. After leaving Elmo the storm continued into the country in a southwest direction, and it is feared that more fatalities have occurred. Several dwellings have been known to have been blown to pieces, but the fate of their occupants is unknown.

A deluge of rain added its share to the misfortune of the stricken people and tonight the homeless inhabitants are being cared for at the few remaining homes that escaped the fury of the storm.

Ottumwa Daily Courier, Ottumwa, IA 27 May 1903