Talmage, IA Train Wreck, Feb 1915

Lorimor IA tain wreck 2-22-1915.jpg Lorimor IA tain wreck 2-22-1915 2.jpg

TWO LOSE LIVES IN BAD WRECK ON GREAT WESTERN.

ENGINEER AND FIREMAN ON SOUTH BOUND PASSENGER TRAIN KILLED.

TWO ARE SERIOUSLY HURT.

SPREADING RAILS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN CAUSE OF THE DISASTER.

Register and Leader: HARRY HITCHCOCK, of Des Moines, a fireman on the Great Western, was instantly killed and JAMES MAXWELL of this city, died as a result of injuries received in a wreck Monday morning two and one-half miles north of Talmage.
The wreck is thought to have been caused by derailment, careful examination of the track failed to reveal why the big engine jumped the track and dragged with it half of the train, but rails, ties and all were torn away when the engine are cars toppled off the embankment.
The make up of the train with all steel coaches probably averted a repetition of the Green Mountain disaster in March, 1910, when more than fifty passengers met death.
Not one of the passengers were seriously hurt. Several received minor bruises which were forgotten after an examination of the wreck was made and the narrow escape appreciated.
According to many of the crew the train was running at about thirty miles an hour when the accident happened. A gang of men had been repairing the track near where the train plouged over the embannkment. The only warning was a jar which threw nearly everybody off their seats, and the engine and three cars had jumped from the rails.
There were six in the train. The engine and tender with two baggage cars, went to the bottom of a twenty foot embankment. The smoker remained in a perilous position on its side ready to turn over in its plunge to the bottom.
A chair car, a sleeper and a diner remained partly on the track. The chair car was partly over the embankment but in no danger of falling. The sleeper and diner stood on the track and had plowed into the rock bed, tearing up the tracks and ties. The trucks on both those cars were broken from the jarring after the train left the track.
Dr. G. M. Boteler and Lewis Motter of St. Joseph, Mo., were in the smoking compartment of the Pullman when the train left the rails. They immediately jumped up from the floor where the jar had deposited them and passed through two other cars to see what had happened.

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