Marshalltown, IA Train Wreck, Sep 1892

FOUR WERE KILLED.

THE WRECK NEAR MARSHALLTOWN WORSE THAN REPORTED.

TRAIN DISPATCHERS' FAULT.

NEGLIGENCE ON THE PART OF TRAIN DISPATCHERS APPARENTLY THE CAUSE OF THE WRECK.

A TERRIBLE SMASHUP.

BOTH ENGINES DEMOLISHED AND THE CARS PILES UP IN A GREAT MASS -- FULL PARTICULARS.

Four Were Killed.
Marshalltown, Sept. 16 -- A terrible head-end collision occurred on the C. & N. W. railroad, three and a half miles west of this city, shortly before noon yesterday.
Freidht No. 21, west bound, due here at 8:25 a.m., was late. The train dispatcher at Belle Plaine gave orders to meet No. 14 accommodation, coming east, at LaMoile. The train dispatcher here O.Kd.
No. 21's orders, but failed to hold No. 14 at LaMoile. The engine going west was 705, ASHTON engineer, the engine coming east was No. 676, HOWES engineer. They met on the curve about two and a half miles west of this city, while both were going at a high rate of speed. The crash was terrific and the havoc awful. Both engines were demolished and melted into each other in a shapeless mass, while the cars were piled upon one another seven or eight deep, many of them being badly demolished. An emigrant train was immediately in the rear of the engine going west and a frightful scene followed the deadly crash. Two physicians and a wrecking train were hurriedly dispatched to the scene at once. The west train left here at 11:12, and the collision occurred about five minutes later.
Cars and engines are all piled together in an undescribable mass. The wreck occurred in one of the worst curves on this division, where the track winds around a steep hill, rising high in the air, which effectually shuts out the view of a trainman from either direction until they are almost upon each other. Both trains were running at a high rate of speed at the time of the collision, the engine of the east bound train No. 676, was thrown into the air and back upon its own tank, crushing it out of all semblence of its former shape while the locomotive proper is broken and twisted until it resembles a mass of scrap iron more than the beautiful machines that always excite our admiration. Engineer TOM HOWES of the 676 is buried beneath his machine while both, the engineer and fireman of the 705 freighter with an emigrant in the car next to it are also in the ruins.
The 705 which is of the heavy mogul type, was thrown to the right of the track, and its pilot rests on a bank twenty feet high. The force of the collision is shown from the fact that seven cars of the east-bound train are crushed together in a shapeless mass, occuping a space of about two car lengths immediately behind engine 676, while those of the west-bound train are piled up in the air fully fifteen feet high. A car of sheep was in the train going west and the iteous bleating of these poor animals as they lie in the midst of the debris, many of them being slowly roasted to death, jammed against the hot boilers, lends added horror to the scene.
One of the trainmen made the following statement of the cause of the occurrence: Train No. 14, the regular daily accomodation train was a few minutes late at LaMoile, and had orders to meet the west-bound train No. 21 at Marshalltown. The train dispatcher at Belle Plaine gave 21 orders to meed 14 at La Moile but did not get the orders to LaMoile in time to catch 14, they having pulled out a few minutes before, with the above result. This probably will put the blame in the dispatcher' office.
The crew of No. 14 were, engineer TOM HOWES of Clinton; fireman, CON TUSING, of Clinton; conductor, SHATTENKICK of Clinton; brakemen, FRANK HUMPHREY and W. BROMLEY. Of train No. 21: engineer, P. J. ASHTON; fireman, WM. LINEBAUGH; fireman, A. J. KNIGHT, and JACK TAYLOR; conductor, G. A. KNIGHT.
The list of victims is as follows:
Killed.
P. J. ASHTON, engine 705.
TOM HOWES, engine 676, Clinton.
WM. LINEBAUGH, fireman, Boone.
Emigrant, name unknown.

Cedar Rapids Evening Gazette Iowa 1892-09-16