Various Towns, OH & IN Destructive Tornado, Apr 1884

FALLEN BEFORE THE CYCLONE.

GREAT DESTRUCTION DONE IN OHIO AND INDIANA BY THE TORNADO OF TUESDAY.

(Special Dispatch to The Boston Globe)
Dayton, O., April 3. -- Tuesday evening intelligence from the west and north of here showed that yesterday's storm was a veritable tornado in those sections, especially along the boundary line of the States of Indiana and Ohio. The little town of Oakville, just beyond the line, was literally wiped from the face of the earth. The place comprised about fifty houses, all of which were destroyed. Nine people were killed.
The following names have been telegraphed to this city:
ANNA DEARBORN.
Two sons of Colonel JOHNSON.
JAMES SANDERS.
K. WALTER SMYTH.
AMOS COX.
The names of the others are not known. Besides the above about seventy-five people are reported injured, some probably fatally.
From this point the tornado chose a course due east, and swept clear across the State of Ohio. At Greenville, the county seat of Drake County, it wrought terrible destruction. Houses were blown down and totally destroyed, while others were unroofed and otherwise injured. At and near this place a number of people were seriously injured, but only one is reported killed, the six-year-old daughter of AMOS COX, who was crushed between falling timbers.
The seriously wounded are:
HENRY FLEMING, leg and arm broken.
ALEXANDER WHITE and wife, seriously injured, probably fatally.
AMOX COX, both legs broken and crushed.
J. A. FLEMING, one arm and leg broken.
MRS. ELKER, seriously injured about the head.
JAMES MENDENHALL, badly bruised.
PATRICK FOREMAN, leg broken.
J. VANSTA, skull fractured.
Besides the above there were a number of others more or less injured. At Jayville, a small place a few miles east of Greenville, the destruction was great. Houses were blown down and fences carried away, while quite a number of people were injured. None are reported killed. Nearly every house in the town is somewhat damaged. At Troy, just to the north of here, the destruction was also great. The agricultural scraper works, a large, new brick factory, was destroyed, with about 3000 finished machines. Between this place and Casstown, about four miles distant, all the fences were torn down and houses in both places destroyed, but no one was seriously hurt.

Boston Daily Globe Massachusetts 1884-04-04