Hollisville, IN Train Hits Cow And Crashes, Aug 1866

ADDITIONAL PARTICULARS.

A TRAIN ON THE MICHIGAN SOUTHERN RAILROAD THROWN DOWN AN EMBANKMENT ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY FEET -- TWENTY-THREE PERSONS INJURED, ETC.

Chicago, August 19. -- A terrible railroad disaster occurred this morning at Hollisville, Ind., about forty miles from this city, on the Michigan Southern Railroad. The regular passenger train, consisting of three sleeping cars and three passenger coaches, shortly after leaving Laporte was thrown off the track by a cow, which, in some curious manner, was caught between two of the sleeping cars.
The train was running about twenty-five miles an hour at the time. The three sleeping and all the passenger coaches were hurled down an embankment 140 feet. One of the sleeping cars rolled over three times, and finally came right side up at the bottom. They were all badly shattered.
Twenty-three persons were injured, but none, strange to say, were killed. At the time of the accident one of the cars was thrown against a telegraph pole, severing the wire, so that it was some time before medical attendance could be got from Laporte.
The most of the wounded were taken back to Laporte. Those brought on to this city are:
MOSES KENNAMAN, cattle-dealer of Chicago, are broken.
MR. STREET, of Buffalo, slightly injured.
L. P. HART, of Bath, N.Y., President of the Ohio River Coal Company, slightly injured.
S. A. FREEMAN, of Boston, head cut.
G. EDMONDS, of Illinois, slightly injured.
S. W. HOUGH, of Albany, cut over the eye.
MR. LAWRENCE, of Albany, slightly injured.
C. FITZSIMMONS, of Rochester, N.Y., slightly injured.
The names of those left at Laporte have not been received here, but some of them are seriously injured.

Evening Telegraph Philadelphia Pennsylvania 1866-08-20