Calumet Harbor, IL Barge MATERIAL SERVICE Lost, July 1936

MATERIAL SERVICE BARGE

BOAT CAPSIZES 15 MEN FEARED DEAD IN WATER.

SURVIVORS GIVE LISTS OF PERSONS THOUGHT TO HAVE DROWNED AFTER SEVEN WERE SAVED.

SANK SWIFTLY.

Chicago, July 29 (AP) - Fifteen members of a crew of 22 men were believed drowned early today when the lake-river barge "Material Service," carrying 2,500 tons of gravel, ran into choppy water as it made for Calumet Harbor, listed suddenly and sank in Lake Michigan.
Seven of the crew were rescued, but CAPT. CHARLES D. BROWN of Port Huron, Mich., was presumed to have died with the 14 others. One man at first reported missing was found later to have missed the boat.
The tragedy struck the vessel at 1:30 a.m. (Eastern Standard Time) as it was southbound after traveling from Lockport, through the Chicago River and into the choppy lake. Had the boat gone half a mile farther it would have reached the calm waters of the harbor.

Those Missing.
Those missing, as compiled from the official list of the crew given out by the Leathem Smith-Putnam Navigation Company, owners of the boat:
CAPTAIN BROWN.
MELVIN TUFTS, second mate, Lockport, Ill.
JOHN MELBY, Wheelman, Chicago.
FRED SAMUELSON, watchman, Chicago.
ELMER BERGER, deck hand, Chicago.
CARL BROWN, deck hand, Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.
TONY CASITY, steward, Lockport.
JOE OBERLIN, second cook, Lockport.
ODIN JOHNSON, chief engineer, Le Mont, Ill.
ELMER BERGSLAND, boom man, Lockport, Ill.
LEIF OLSON, scrapper man, Chicago.
CHARLES PEGSTEAD, oiler, Chicago.
DAR HANSEN, oiler, Sturgeon Bay, Wis.
HARRY MEYERS, oiler, Lockport.
"MICKEY" ______, Chicago, a new member of the crew.
John Palmer of Lockport, first assistant engineer, at first believed drowned was said by first mate John M. Johnson, one of the rescued, to have missed the boat as it left Lockport.
A company official estimated the boat's value at half a million dollars.
Heroes in a dramatic rescue of Elton A. Washburn, 34, of Sturgeon Bay, a handyman on the barge, were A. H. Pierce, keeper of the 92nd Street Lighthouse, and his assistant, Irving Carlson.
Washburn was found floating on a plank after the lighthouse crew had been aroused by cries for help from sailors swimming near the scene of the disaster.
The survivors were taken to a hospital in South Chicago. The only one hurt was Washburn, whose left leg and right shoulder were cut. The rest suffered from exhaustion and shock.
One of the rescued, Alfred Melby, was despondent because his father JOHN MELBY, 49, a wheelman, was among the missing.

Kingsport Times Tennessee 1936-07-29