Chicago, IL Train Hits Carriage, Jan 1890

UNITED IN DEATH.

A FATHER AND MOTHER KILLED AT CHICAGO WHILE ON THEIR WAY TO BURY THEIR LITTLE CHILD -- A TRAIN RUNNING AT FULL SPEED DASHES INTO THE MOURNERS' CARRIAGE.

Chicago, Jan. 24. -- A most distressing accident, which resulted in the death of four persons, occurred at Rose Hill Cemetery, on the Chicago & Northwestern road, Thursday afternoon. MR. and MRS. FRED PAYNE, whose home was at No. 24 Aberdeen Street, were on their way with a few friends to bury their 5-months-old babe. There were only four carriages in the procession. MR. and MRS. PAYNE were in the carriage immediately following the hearse, and with them were MRS. WILLIAM REPROGEL and GRACIE PAYNE, their little 8-year-old daughter. It was 3:30 o'clock in the afternoon, and the Milwaukee express, four minutes behind time, was nearing the city at a high rate of speed. As the PAYNE carriage came squarely on the track the engine struck it in the center, tearing it into splinters and instantly killing MR. and MRS. PAYNE. MRS. REPROGEL and SIMON ANDERSON, the driver, received injuries from which they died within two hours afterward.
All who witnessed or knew any thing of the occurrence agree that no warning whatever of its approach was given by the flying train. The engineer was E. J. Mahoney, and the fireman William Anderson. The train was in charge of Conductor Barney Kavanaugh. The train stopped within a block of where the accident occurred, backed up and the bodies of the dead and injured were placed in the baggagecar. MRS. REPROGAL and ANDERSON, the driver, were still alive when the train reached the depot at North Chicago Avenue. The North Chicago Avenue Police station was notified and at 5 o'clock Officer Finn with the signal-service wagon removed ANDERSON to the Emergency hospital, corner La Salle and Superior Streets, where he died a few moments later. The bodies of MR. and MRS. PAYNE were removed to the Chicago & Northwestern depot at Wells Street, whence they were taken to Jordan's undertaking establishment.
MRS. REPROGEL died shortly after reaching the depot.
The track in the vicinity where the accident occurred is straight and level, and the catastrophe seems to have been entirely without excuse. The grief among the surviving relatives as they gazed upon the mutilated bodies lying upon the rude cots prepared for their reception at the depot was heartrending. MRS. PAYNE'S face was badly scraped off and the top of her husband's head was entirely crushed in. MRS. REPROGEL was slightly disfigured, but the old driver's face was terribly cut and bruised and his eyes swollen and blackened.
Late in the evening Engineer Mahoney was arrested for causing the death of these four persons and was locked up at the East Chicago Avenue station pending an investigation of the accident by the coroner. He was badly broken up when informed that he would have to pass the night in a cell, and stoutly protested his innocence of any criminal neglect of his causing the death of the four victims. He said that from his seat in the engine, which was on the opposite side to that from which the funeral was approaching, he could not see any thing except directly ahead of the engine. On the other hand, those of the funeral procession could, before they reached the crossing, command a full view of the track in either direction. They must have seen the train coming.

Webster City Tribune Iowa 1890-01-31