Chicago, IL (Lake Michigan) Naval Cutter Capsizes, Sep 1912

ELEVEN DROWN IN MICHIGAN.

SQUALL STRIKES LAKE AND CAPSIZES CUTTER OF NAVAL STATION.

8 BODIES RECOVERED.

ALL WERE YOUTHS BETWEEN 16 AND 23 YEARS OLD -- FOURTEEN ESCAPED ALIVE.

Chicago, Sept. 16. -- Eleven youths, between 16 and 23 years old, were drowned in Lake Michigan late Sunday afternoon, when a cutter from the United States Naval Training Station at North Chicago was capsized in a storm.
The boys were naval apprentices.
The bodies of five of the victims have been recovered and identified.
The five identified dead:
R. C. HARLAN, 18, Bloomingdale, Ind.
I. L. SOUTHWORTH, 18, 312 1/2 Jane Street, Pittsburg, Pa.
J. WALLACE, 18, Turner, Ind.
W. N. AMTROBUS, 21, 32 Regent Street, Indianapolis, Ind.
J. A. PATTON, 23, Stanton, Ohio.
The missing:
Privates CAMININ, WINKLER, J. R. COOKE, STANLEY, J. F. JACKSON and FIELD.
There were just thirteen of the apprentices and the gunner's mate who escaped alive. The roll call of the rescued showed the following names at the hospital last night:
A. I. B. NELSON, Private FISCHER, Private WYATT, M. N. STOCKTON, Private SHORACK, W. L. EARLEY, A. C. WILD, WILLIAM JAMES PATTERSON, WILLIAM ERICKSON, WILLIAM KNUDSON, Private BAULD, Private PULLEN and Gunner's Mate NEGIS.
The boys were from the Middle and Western states.
The party, in which were apprentices, left the training station shortly after 2 o'clock in charge of Gunner's Mate M. N. NEGIS, and after cruising about for two hours headed for North Chicago.
A few minutes later, while the cutter was north of Lake Forest, a squall struck the boat, the sails were lowered an up anchor was thrown out.
NEGIS, it is said, planned to let the cutter ride out the storm, but the waves soon were running so high that the boat dragged its anchor and gradually was being driven onto the beach.
When within 200 feet of the shore the cutter overturned and its occupants were thrown into the water.
Captain W. F. Fullam, commandant of the naval training station, saw the danger of the apprentices from his headquarters and sent a motor boat to the rescue. But the craft also was capsized before it had gone far and the men in charge of it were obliged to swim back to the shore.
Later a force of rescuers was sent along the shore to where the cutter had been wrecked. Many of the boys swam to land and others floated ashore on oars and wreckage.
A number were rescued from the surf by officers of the training station and cared for at homes near the scene of the wreck.
It was reported that several of the boys were unable to swim and became seasick when the squall struck the cutter.

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