Chicago, IL Barnett House and Evangeline Hotel Fire - 6 Known Dead

SIX KNOWN DEAD IN CHICAGO FIRE HORROR.

FLAMES BREAK LOOSE IN CROWDED LODGING HOUSES AND FIREMEN FIGHT LOSING BATTLE IN EFFORTS AT RESCUE.

Chicago, March 9. -- Six men lost their lives in the fire that charred the Barnett house, a ten and fifteen cent lodging house at Clark and Harrison streets, and the Salvation army hotel known as the "Evangenline," adjoining it, this morning. Seven others are in the hospitals, four of whom, it is believed, will die. Fifteen or twenty others were burned or injured in the panic that followed.
The Dead:
THOMAS McMAHON, 60.
JOHN COLLINS, 52.
J. DERMODY, 63.
J. OLSON, 43.
One Unidentified Man, body so badly burned identification impossible.
The seriously injured:
EDWARD WALTMAN, found after the fire, broken leg, burns.
EDWARD BRAGDEN, jumped, internally injured.
THOMAS MURPHY, bruised and burned.
PATRICK SHIELDS, fell from fire escape.
WALTHAM BAGENHOFF, jumped from third story, legs broken, internally injured.
OSCAR HAMEN, burned.
Two of the dead lost their lives by jumping from the upper windows of the four-story building. Nearly 200 lodgers were in the two buildings when the flames broke out. They were mostly unemployed workingmen, tramps and crippled beggars who were unable to help themselves in the fight for life.
Early reports given out by Fire Chief SEYFERLICH placed the number of dead at eight, with three other bodies left in the ruins and seven others supposed to be in the flames. When the fire was extinguished two men, whom the firemen had tried to reach and later gave up for dead, were found alive. At 11:30 Chief SEYFERLICH stated he was satisfied there were no more bodies in the building.
Scores of men were saved by the heroism of the firemen and occupants of adjoining buildings.
An investigation by the building inspector and the coroner into the cause of the fire and the alleged violation of fire regulations and the building code has been ordered.
The Barnett lodging house was known as a gathering place for crippled beggars. Of more than a hundred lodgers, fifty were said to be crippled, hunchbacks, one armed or one legged men, who made their living by begging in the saloons and on the streets.
Two of the dead were hunchbacks and several of those in the hospitals were cripples.
A panic immediately followed the discovery of the fire and before the fire department arrived at the scene men were jumping from the upper stories and crowding each other off the fire escapes. Nearly all the dead were in bed and were suffocated before they could get out of the rooms.
When the firemen arrived the stairways in the buildings were choked with frantic men and women trying to fight their way to the street. All the upper stories were filled with dense smoke and men were dropped on every floor. The firemen stretched life nets and motioned for those who could be seen at the smoke filled windows of the upper stories to jump. Other firemen attempted to explore the second and third stories. Five women, all unconscious, were carried from the third floor of the Salvation Army building. On the fourth floor landing two of a party of three firemen dropped, overcome by the smoke. Their companions pulled them to safety and others took up the fight to rescue the imprisoned lodgers.

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