Honolulu Harbor, HI Submarine F-4 Lost, Mar 1915

Submarine F-4.jpg

POWERFUL CRANES BEGIN WORK OF RAISING SUBMARINE F-4.

FATE OF CREW MAY BE KNOWN BY NIGHTFALL.

HONOLULU OFFICIALS HAVE FAINT HOPE THAT SOME MAY YET BE RESCUED.

FLEET STANDS BY TO HELP.

NAVY DEPARTMENT BELIEVES CORAL REEF PUNCTURED SIDES OF ILL-FATED CRAFT.

Honolulu, March 27. -- The dredge California arrived from the Pearl Harbor naval station today, and the actual work of raising the submarine F-4 has begun.
The California's powerful derricks and cranes are expected to bring the submerged vessel to the surface before night.
Some navy officials here still held faint hope that some of the twenty-one men entombed in the F-4 may yet be rescued alive.
A fleet of vessels, including the submarine flotilla, are in the immediate vicinity ready to render every assistance.
Quantities of oil -- the F-4 was an oil burner -- which came to the surface when the wrecking vessels found and attempted to tow the vessel to more shallow waters make it certain in the minds of everyone here that no life remains in the submarine craft.
There is but one chance in a million.
Rear Admiral Moore, commandant of the naval station, thinks that lives may be spared.
This one chance is that small, special oxygen emergency compartments may have been the refuge for a few of the crew from the inrushing waters.
The depth to which the vessel sunk is now accepted as the direct cause of the first American submarine disaster. Enormous water pressure at 300 feet, it is regarded certain, crushed in her sides like an egg shell.
The lapse of time since the vessel dived Thursday morning is not regarded as an important factor. She had enough oxygen and supplies to last forty-eight hours she has been submerged, but she was not built to withstand water pressure at 300 feet, even for a minute.
The naval tug Navajo and steamer Makala, whose grappling hooks found the submarine, on even keel, stood by all night retaining their cables taut to prevent loss anew of their sunken quarry by action of the high tides, and waiting for daybreak to bring wrecking tugs to begin actual work of raising the vessel.
When the vessel was located arrangements were being made to take kite photographs of the bottom of the harbor entrance by J. F. Haworth, of the Harvard expedition, who is in the Hawaiian Islands photographing volcanoes. Rear Admiral Moore hoped the powerful lenses of these kite cameras might register the sunken craft upon the films.
In the meantime the army engineers had been working upon a theory that the lost submarine had been tide-drifted, and suggested a new place to take up the search.
A boat was dispatched there with diving bells and other equipment. The point was three miles southeast of the harbor entrance.
Secretary of the Navy Daniels and other officials today abandoned all hope that any officers or men on the ill-fated F-4, which went to the bottom near the entrance of Honolulu Harbor, will be found alive.
The latest official advices to the department are that the F-4 has been located and efforts are being made to raise her. Fuller details, however, are given in the press dispatches than in the official reports to the department.

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