New Holland, GA Tornado, Jun 1903

The furious wind next descended on the plant of the Pacolet cotton mills, at New Holland, two miles from the Southern railway station. This is one of the largest cotton mills in the South, employing more than 600 hands. The storm spared the Pacolet factory, but demolished a hundred cottages standing near by, tenanted by its operatives.

Here the fatalities were great, more than 35 persons being buried in the ruins of the cottages. Bodies of men, women and children were blown hundreds of yards through the air and many of them when picked up bore no semblance to humanity. The trunk of one boy was found with head decapitated as if by a guillotine.

From New Holland the tornado swept onward to the east in the direction of White Sulphur, a town of about 100 persons. The extent of its destruction there cannot now be definitely told, but reports so far received indicate considerable loss of life.

The bodies of most of the dead in the two cotton mills were fearfully torn and mangled; the skulls of many of them were crushed and the limbs broken; some were torn and crushed about the abdomen.

The entire pathway of the storm, extending two miles from the Gainsville mills, around the outskirts of the city to the Pacolet mills at New Holland, is a mass of ruins, but fortunately the cottages in the train of the tornado between the Southern station and New Holland were those of Negroes, who were all absent from the city yesterday in attendance upon a colored excursion. Business is almost entirely suspended throughout the city, the attention of everybody being given to the care of the wounded and suffering. There is no lack of medical attention, many surgeons being present from Atlanta and other cities. There is great need, however, of clothing, antiseptics and other medical supplies.

The local militia have been called out for police duty. The city is very orderly and quiet and only a few instances of pillaging have been reported.

The work of the tornado was complete. From the factory where it first descended upon the doomed city to the hills beyond New Holland, where it rose into the upper air, the destruction of property is appalling. Along this entire course, for a distance of two miles, there is not a fence standing, not a habitable house, most of the latter being reduced to strips like laths and scarcely a tree left.

At New Holland the storm did its worst. Nothing but the barren red hills are left there to tell the story of the awful disaster. For a distance of three quarters of a mile on the hillsides and the valley to the left of the Pacolet mills the ground is covered almost entirely by the fragments of the 150 houses that were there when the twisting tornado swept down.

The Landmark, Statesville, NC 5 Jun 1903

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FROM CLEAR SKY

The storm came from the south out of almost a clear sky, swooping down on the Gainsville cotton mills, near the southern railroad station, at 12:45 p. m.

The cyclone then swept around the outskirts of the city to New Holland, two miles away, where are located the Pacolet cotton mills, one of the largest institutions of this character in the south.

The property loss at Pacolet mills is estimated t $75,000 and at the Gainsville cotton mills at $40,000.

At New Holland it is believed at least 75 people were killed.

At New Holland.

The bodies recovered at New Holland:
MRS. H. H. NELSON.
WILL TATUM.
MYRTICE WESTMORELAND.
MAGGIE WESTMORELAND.
MRS A. L. NIX.
MRS. NEELY.
MRS. JANE LEFORD and BABY.
MRS. _. R. WHITE and two children.
BABY OF MRS MAGEE.
MRS. W. M. BOBO.
MRS. Bryant AND SON.
BENNIE HENDRIX.
MRS. T.A. COKER.
JOHN J. MAYNE.
Mrs. MARION WILLBANKS.
Two children of H. L. PHILLIPS.
MRS. TOM TRUELOVE.
MRS. WILLIAM WESTMORLAND.
ALBERT LLOYD.
MRS OKELLY.
MRS. R. H. PASSA and son.
MRS. AGLE.
Negro and white man, names unknown.

Decatur Herald, Decatur, IL 2 Jun 1903