Covington, GA School House Fire, Nov 1922

SEARCH FOR BODIES OF CHILDREN.

REPORTED MISSING AFTER SCHOOL HOUSE FIRE IN GEORGIA.

AT LEAST THREE TOTS PERISHED IS BELIEF -- FIFTEEN BURNED AND BRAVE TEACHER MAY BE FATALLY INJURED.

Covington, Ga., Nov. 29. -- (By A.P.) -- Two dead and 38 injured was the toll taken in the buring of the High Point community school house near here yesterday when the structure in which 99 children were engaged in studies was destroyed by flames.
The dead were JAMES STEELE, little son of John J. Steele and the eight year old son of Charles Bachelor.
These pupils were in the room of MRS. OSCAR GRANT, who heoically stood by the window and dropped forty children to the ground before the floor of her room gave way and she was englufed in flames. The two boys were lost in the smoke.
Investigation today showed 17 of the children were suffering from broken limbs as the result of the twenty foot drop. Anxiety is felt over the condition of four children whose lungs were injured by breathing flames.
The name of MISS MARY HOWE, home demonstration agent, was being linked with that of MRS. GRANT. She helped rescue children from the burning building and then jumped into her automobile and hurried to Covington for aid.

Covington, Ga., Nov. 28 -- (By A.P.) -- Searching parties continued today to comb among the debris of the burned High Point community school house, near here for the bodies of twelve children reported missing after a fire yesterday afternoon which cost, according to school officials, the lives of at least three children, burns to fifteen and painful injuries to thirty-five. One teacher also was burned probably fatally.
"Oh, look at the pretty white dust," exclaimed one of the children in a second floor room.
The "dust" was smoke. It came from the direction of the door, the single exit from the room. The teacher MRS. OSCAR GRANT, ran to the door, opened it and a burst of smoke drove her back. The hallway was in flames and the stairs had crumbled.
Inside were forty children. MRS. GRANT locked the door, calmly walked to the window and told the children to line up. The ground was about 20 feet below. The drop meant almost certain injury, but to stay meant death to them all.
The teacher began lowering the children but the flames entered the room and licked rapidly toward the window. Three children remained in the line. The flames engulfed them, MRS. GRANT saying later she jumped into the fire to save them. The teacher's clothing caught fire and she jumped from the window.
Doctors said she received burns, a fractured limb and internal injuries.
Only five of the children dropped by MRS. GRANT escaped injuries.
An overheated stove is believed to have caused the fire.

Steubenville Herald Ohio 1922-11-30