Atlanta, GA Hospital Fire, June 1930

FUMES NOT TO PROVE FATAL.

TEN PERSONS INHALED GAS OF BURNING FILM IN ATLANTA HOSPITAL.

Atlanta, June 21. (AP) -- Ten persons, including newspapermen, firemen and attaches, who inhaled
fumes from burning x-ray films at Grady hospital, were under the observation of physicians today while authorities supervised the return of 250 Negro patients, removed during yesterday's fire.

Dr. J. J. Clark expressed the opinion that only a "safety" type of film was exposed to the fire and
that those who inhaled its fumes would suffer no serious consequences, but W. Frank Lucklesh, manager of the Atlanta office of a film manufacturing company, said that some old film, capable of giving off a deadly gas, was stored in the hospital in supposedly fire-proof cabinets.

Dr. Frank Lavieri of Chicago was overcome by smoke and last night JAMES JONES, a Negro orderly, who was credited by hospital authorities with assisting in the removal of 20 patients, collapsed. His condition was desceibed as serious.
The flames, punctuated by two explosions, were confined to a single room used for x-ray work.
The 250 Negro patients in adjacent wards were removed on stretchers. They suffered only from shock.

Mason City Globe Gazette Iowa 1930-06-21