Pensacola, FL Hurricane Strike, Sept 1906

1906 Pensacola Hurricane Damage 1906 Pensacola Hurricane Damage

DELUGE FOLLOWS FATAL HURRICANE; USE STREET BOATS.

THIRTY KNOWN DEAD NEAR PENSACOLA, WITH LOSS OF $8,000,000.

Pensacola, Fla., (via Flomaton, Ala., by courier)
Sept. 29. -- Flood followed hurricane wind, and rain this morning, and the city tonight is nearly submerged. Seven and one-half inches of rain fell in a little over three hours and the main streets of the city were turned into veritable rivers by this tremendous downpour. In some instances the water is shoulder deep. First floor cellars and many residences were deluged. Business is at a standstill. Debris of every description is floating through the streets, being the mute messengers of the terrible West Indian hurricane of last Thursday.

Unique and quaint methods are being devised to go from one part of the city to another. Small boats, bathing suits, rafts, and like methods are being used.
From the latest reports obtainable the list of dead in this vicinity number at least thirty. The damage will total, at the lowest estimate $8,000,000, as a result of the recent storm and flood.

The following list of the dead has been revised up to date:
In Pensacola:
MRS. LE BARON GONZALES.
GOERGE GONZALES, aged thirteen.
GEORGE MORGAN, fisherman.
MRS. MORGAN, wife of George Morgan, and daughter, aged six.
In Fort McRae:
Sergeant OVERLANDER.
Wife of Sergeant PRENTISS.
Private JORDAN.
Private name unknown.
At Wolsey:
ED HUGHES.
TOM BARD and wife, all colored.
At Quarantine Station:
M. COLLIER, hospital attendant.
R. ROSS, hospital attendant.
Three seamen, from British steamer, names not learned.
At Escambia Ridge:
MRS. T. F. MATTHEWS, and two children.
Two section hands, colored.

Many persons are missing and this list will probably be greatly augmented when the exact situation if learned.

Rescue parties are busily engaged in searching the mammoth piles of wreckage for victims of the storm. The life saving station was totally destroyed.

At McRae, the destruction is almost complete. Like condition obtains at Fort Pickens and Quarantine Station. Reports from Fort Barrancas state that the west and south shore line is banked high with lumber sloops, steamers, sailing vessels, and wreckage of every destription. Naval vessels are high and dry on the beach and the navy yard is inundated.

On the naval reservation 300 people are homeless and destitute. Roofs on many business houses were blown away. The roof of the Merchants Hotel was torn off and the place completely drenched.

Washington Times District of Columbia 1906-09-30

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