Cimarron, CO Bomber Crashes Into Peak, Apr 1942

CREW OF SEVEN MEN FOUND DEAD IN WRECKAGE OF MISSING BOMBER.

COWBOY, ARMY MAN REACH CRASH SCENE NEAR CIMARRON.

PLANE HIT PEAK.

SALVAGE PARTY, INVESTIGATORS DUE AT SCENE TODAY.

The seven officers and men aboard the Albuquerque Air Base bomber which had been missing for nine days, were killed when it crashed into a peak southwest of Cimarron, Col., Frank D. Hackett, Base Commander, reported Friday night.
The colonel said a cowboy and a member of the Army, whose names he did not know, Friday afternoon reached by horseback, the scene of the crash, after the wreckage had been sighted earlier in the day from the air. The two men confirmed the belief of Army flyers that all on board the plane were killed in the crash.
Those aboard were:
Capt. ROBERT O. REDDING of Minature, Neb., the pilot.
Lieut. J. G. RUFF, San Jose, Cal., co-pilot.
Lieut. G. E. VAN HOOVER, Kansas City, flight engineer.
Lieut. CHARLES O. REYNARD, JR., Hiram, Ohio.
Lieut. ROWLAND L. JEFFERIES, Kansas City.
Corp. DUANE M. PETERSON, Salt Lake City.
Corp. PHILIP MACOMBER, Pendleton Field, Ore.
The two men stayed but a short time at the scene. They are to lead a Base crew to the plane Saturday.
The crew, including ambulances to remove the bodies and technicians to examine the plane's instruments, gasoline tanks and radio in an effort to determine the cause of the crash, was sent from here Friday. It remained overnight at Cimarron, and members planned to leave at daybreak for the trek to the wreckage.
The plane is difficult to reach from the ground, Col. Hackett reported, because of deep snows and because a bridge over an arroyo has been washed away. This will necessitate leaving the ambulances and other motor vehicles and traveling the last few miles by horse, the colonel said.
Lieut. Col. A. D. Smith, operations officer at the Air Base, after an aerial inspection of the wreck, reported to the Associated Press that the plane is lying near the top of Trail Peak, which juts 10,000 feet into the sky about 15 miles southwest of Cimarron. The aerial inspection disclosed that the fuselage was crushed when the ship plowed into pine woods.
The plane disappeared in a storm on the night of April 22 while en route back to its Albuquerque base on a cross-country training flight from Kansas City. It was last reported over Las Vegas shortly after 8 o'clock that night.

Albuquerque Journal New Mexico 1942-05-02