Point Arguello, CA Honda Point Disaster, Sep 1923

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23 TARS DIE AS U.S. SHIPS RUN ON ROCKS.

SEVEN DESTROYERS HELD FAST AGROUND ON REEFS OFF CALIFORNIA COAST.

ONE BOAT TURNS TURTLE AND SINKS WITH ALL ABOARD IN 1 MINUTES 37 SECONDS.

QUAKE MIGHT BE CAUSE.

NAVAL CRAFT ATTRACTED BY LOADS OF SURVIVORS FROM DAMAGED PASSENGER VESSEL.

By Associated Press.
Santa Barbara, Calif. -- Twenty-three sailors dead and fifteen injured; seven destroyers of the Pacific squadron of the battle fleet held fast between rocks off Point Arguello light in the Pacific ocean between San Francisco and Los Angeles.
These were outstanding consequences Monday of the navy's major marine disaster in Pacific waters. The injured were being nursed at hospitals here; a trainload of survivors was headed for San Diego, the naval base, while the seven ships were fast approaching total wrecks by the pounding of the surf.
The warships went ashore while cruising from San Francisco to San Diego Saturday night shortly after 9 o'clock in a dense fog. Mistaken position in relation to the coast line is believed to have caused the crash. The destroyers were speeding through the fog hugging the shore in single file formation when they piled up on the rocks from 200 to 500 yards apart about 300 yards off shore.
The fatalities were divided among two destroyers. Seven were from the Delphy and the others died on the destroyed Young, which turned turtle and sank in one minute and 37 seconds. The other destroyers, the S. P. Lee, Nicholas Fuller, Chauncey and Woodbury, went aground in a position which gave their officers and crews a better chance than was afforded the other crews.
The Pacific coast line between San Francisco and San Diego juts into the ocean between Honda and Point Arguello where the vessels were wrecked.
The naval wrecks came while the destroyer Reno had left the cruising line, attracted by open boatloads of survivors from the wrecked S. S. Cuba, a passenger vessel. The Cuba went ashore off San Miguel Island, twelve hours before, and its survivors were picked up by the Reno, except one boat load.
The remaining boat, was picked up by the Standard Oil tanker, W. H. Miller, in the Santa Barbara channel, while its occupants were rowing out to sea in a dense fog, under the impression they were headed for shore. The Miller will reach San Francisco Monday. The Reno landed its survivors at San Pedro Sunday night.

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