Off Vancouver Island, BC Steamer VALENCIA Disaster, Jan 1906

Steamer Valencia Circa 1904 Steamer Valencia Circa 1905 Survivors of the Valencia Wreckage of the Valencia Valencia Monument of Unknown Dead

MANY PERISH; HUNDRED MORE IN GREAT PERIL.

STEAMER VALENCIA GOES ASHORE ON DEADLY "WEST COAST" OFF VANCOUVER ISLAND.

RELIEF SPEEDING TO FAST BREAKING WRECK.

DENSE FOG AND TREMENDOUS HEAVY SEAS GREAT OBSTACLE -- SURVIVORS ARE HUDDLED ON THE SALOON DECK.

Seattle, Wash., Jan. 24. --A special to the Times from Point Beale says the rescue fleet was unable to reach the wreck last night and cannot even now (11 a.m.) approach the Valencia, owing to wind and sea.

Victoria, Jan. 24, 11:45 a.m. -- The steamers Queen and Salvor were unable to make any connection with the wrecked steamer Valencia and scant hope is entertained for those who remain on board.
From Barefield comes news that the tug Czar and steamer Topeka have reached the scene of the wreck, the sea is heavy and a strong southeast gale is blowing. The weather is clear, but it is expected the ship went to pieces during the night.

Tacoma, Wash., Jan. 24. -- A message just received from Cape Beale says: "We only know of fifteen survivors. Nine are ashore fifteen miles from here and six are here. We cannot get any word from the wreck until the men reach here, which we expect at any time. Steamers were unable to reach the wreck during the night. A strong wind prevails and a very heavy sea is running."

Bellingham, Wash., Jan. 24. -- Last night the salvage steamer Salvor from Victoria reached the scene of the wreck of the Valencia according to a special dispatch to the Herald, but had to stand by until daylight, being unable to render assistance to the survivors during the night hours. The work is now proceeding.

Seattle, Wash., Jan. 24. -- Little or nothing has been heard from the scene of the wreck of the Valencia at 9:30 this morning. While it is hoped that relief reached the fast breaking wreck before daylight this morning, such is not believed to be the case, owing to the prevailing weather conditions.
A resume of the situation this morning shows that at least thirty persons perished and perhaps as many as seventy. Something like a hundred persons so far unaccounted for are presumed to be clinging to the wreck.
Bitter criticisms of the government signal service were heard among shipping men. The government wire from Eatoosh Island to the main land has never been maintained. Had the wire been up yesterday morning, tugs could have been instantly dispatched to the scene, instead a whole day was lost.

MAY HAVE BEEN DROWNED.
Victoria, B.C., Jan. 24., 9 a.m. -- A heavy fog is preventing the rescue work at the scene of the wreck of the steamer Valencia. The weather is very thick with a tremendously heavy sea though the wind has died down. Lineman LOGAN, who left Cape Beal last night for the scene of the wreck, by the land trails, has not returned and it cannot be learned whether the steamer survived the southwest gale which, when the last persons left the wreck yesterday, threatened to break up the vessel, on whose saloon deck over one hundred persons were huddled with seas occasionally breaking over the deckhouses and threatening to sweep them away. It is feared at Capt Beale that the rescue steamers can do little in a heavy fog.

BEGAN TO FILL QUICKLY.
A special from Cape Beale states that when the steamer Valencia left San Francisco at 11 a.m. Saturday the weather was clear, but since has been thick and Captain JOHNSON had sonsequently to navigate by reckoning. The officers of the steamer thought they were near Umitilla reef lightship when the vessel drove in on the Vancouver Island coast. Soundings had been taken, 30 fathoms having been secured a few minutes before the vessel struck. When she hit the rocks her engines were reversed and the steamer succeeded in backing off into deep water. She immediately began to fill and so quickly that the engineers and firemen were driven from the engine room and the only chance to save the lives of anyone on board was to drive the vessel ashore.

GREAT LOSS OF LIFE.
When the six survivors who have arrived at Cape Beale left the Valencia she was lying headon to the sea and was about thirty yards from the high bluff on shore, with the water over her main deck. What were left of the passengers, a large number having been previously drowned, were huddled in the saloon deck. When the boats were lowered soon after the vessel was driven into the shore she began to fill and there was a great loss of life.

BOAT CRUSHED BY WAVES.
The boats filled with women and children were smashed against the side of the steamer and all in them were lost. The lights had gone out by this time and the crew could not see to work. Several boats and three life rafts were lowered. Only two of them have been heard from. There were thought to be about 100 persons still on the wreck and the survivors who had reached Cape Beale say at least 50 were drowned alongside the steamer before they left.

ENROUTE TO WRECK SCENE.
Up to 10 o'clock last night efforts to secure further details from Cape Beale of the wreck of the Valencia were unavailling. Three steamers are on the way. The steamer Queen City which left here yesterday passed the wreck without sighting her. The weather was thick at that time. Captain TOWNSEND of the Queen City telegraphed from Bamfield Creek asking if he would return to the wreck, but was ordered to proceed on his voyage. Other steamers are on the way. Captain TOWNSEND reported the wind was greatly increasing from the southwest with a nasty sea running near Cape Beale, which he rounded yesterday afternoon.

The Racine Daily Journal Wisconsin 1906-01-24

THE OFFICIAL LIST OF THE PASSENGERS OF THE VALENCIA IS AS FOLLOWS:
From the Winnipeg Free Press Manitoba 1906-01-25
First Class:
J. S. WIDMER; J. F. NELEY; N. ANDERSON; MISS VANWYCK; MRS. D. D. STEWART; W. S. HUME; ALICE STOLLENBERG and Two Children; F. T. FONDO; R. BROWN; G. W. TAYLOR and Wife; BUT PARKER; C. A. LOBAN; WM. SIBLEY; MRS. W. C. ROSENBERGER; MISS. L. SHAVE; D. N. PETERS; HARRY WARD; G. WALKER; H. T. TELGMAN; W. C. NEELE; H. H. OELACHER; J. J. DUSSEL; MRS. WILKINSON; MISS W. COLE; HARRY WOLLRIDGE; C. ALLISON; FRED ERICSON; CHARLES SAMAEL; WM. SMITH; A. T. RALPH; G. NONENBACKER; G. H. JESSE; W. LONBARDINE; MRS. E. BODERTSCHER; DONALD ROSS; F. F. BUNKER and Wife; GEO. D. A. ARADEN; J. B. GRAHAM; MARRIE D. HARRADEN.

Second Class:
E. PENTILL; JAS. WRIGHT; JAS. INGLETHORN; M. O'NEILL; HARRY GREGGY; W. P. WILSON; JACOB SOORING; JACOB NIKKE; THEO. SHREVE; L. PANTHA; PETER GLUBE; J. E. LUCAS; J. T. DOHERTY; FRANK NOVOCH; MIKE MYCELVICH; SAM. BROWN; SEM TAM; T. J. CAMPBELL; THEO. CHIEVES; J. B. SHANNON; G. ERICKSON; S. E. DAWSON; P. WAUGHTIL; E. WAUGHTIL; T. EMERSON; G. P. NORDSTROW and Wife; T. J. CAMPBELL and Wife; J. MONTGOMERY; C. A. CIZETTE; PAT HOGAN; WM. OGLE and Wife; YOSUKI HOSODA; S. RANCUMA; T. MANWAKE; S. H. HERAKAMPER; D. DAILEY; A. HANDGER; H. HAWKINS; T. SIMPSON; T. MARTIN; C. WEST; W. A. BEAN; H. FISHER; C. YULER; J. MURPHY; R. HILL; J. FERNIE; J. KEATING; J. WILLITS; M. S. SMITH; J. McCAFFERY; A. CARR; J. BOSIE.

LIST OF THE SURVIVORS.
Victoria, B.C., Jan. 24 -- The following is the full list of the survivors of the steamer Valencia. Only fifteen were saved, including seven passengers and eight members of the crew.
Their names are:
MR. BUNKER, assistant school superintendent in Seattle, whose wife and two daughters were drowned.
D. F. RICHLEY, Fireman.
CARL SAMUEL, first class passenger bound to Seattle.
MIKE HONE, second class passenger.
One other second class passenger named BROWN.
One Japanese second cabin passenger, Y. HOSODA, from Oakland for Seattle.
The names of the six who reached Cape Beale are:
T. J. McCARTHY, boatswain.
THOS. SHIELDS, seaman.
F. CAMPBELL, second class passenger, who lost his wife and fifteen year old daughter.
B. E. LEDHOSEN, fireman.
ALBERT WELLS, a passenger seventeen years old, belonging to the United States navy.
JOHN MARK.
W. GOSLIN.
THOS. LAMPSON and CHAS. BROWN, the last four names all seamen, belonging to San Francisco.

Comments

Donald Ross aboard Valencia

I was named for my father, who was named for his uncle, the Donald Ross aboard the Valencia. Donald was unmarried at home in Scotland in 1901 census, some newspaper articles re the Valencia note his wife died 1904 in the Clallum disaster, I cannot see a Ross in the list of Clallum lost, or find a marriage reg for Donald in Scottish or B.C. records... so it may be a reporting error, or she was engaged but not yet married.