Howe Sound, BC Snowslide Wipes Out Camp, Mar 1915

SIXTEEN KILLED; THIRTY MISSING.

SNOWSLIDE WIPES OUT BRITISH COLUMBIA MINING CAMPS AT DEAD OF NIGHT.

TERRIBLE EXPERIENCES.

BOULDERS AS BIG AS HOUSES STRIKE CAMP -- THREE SURVIVORS REACH VANCOUVER.

Vancouver, B.C., March 22. -- At least sixteen people were killed and 24 injured, while 34 are missing, as the result of a snowslide which early this morning swept away several bunk houses at the Britannia mine at Howe Sound, B.C. Besides the bunk houses, part of the aerial tramway of the mine was carried away.
The mine level is on the side of a mountain, and nearly 5,000 feet above the shore of the sound. The tramway destroyed extended from the mine to the beach.
Soon after reports of the avalanche were received here, a steamer with physicians and nurses left for Howe Sound. Details are lacking, owing, it is believed, to the fact that communication with the mine has been cut off, as telephone wires are down.
The Britania is a coal mine employing more than 1,000 men.

Vancouver, B.C., March 22. -- Survivors of the disaster at Britannia arrived tonight on the steamer Balleno. These were: HARRY BAXTER, JIM DOUGAN and B. McPHAIL, none of whom were injured. BAXTER put the time of the disaster at midnight.
They were awakened by a terrible shock that some thought was the blowing up of the magazine. When they went out to search, the whole camp was groaning and calling out for help. Some of the men hurt could hardly crawl along the ground and some were able to walk. One of the boulders that struck the camp, said BAXTER, was as big as a house. When it was light they got some of the wounded. Some of the men were dead. "We got out a mucker who was killed with two of his babies, while his wife and another child were not hurt," said BAXTER. "The dining room and kitchen," he added, "are now covered with rocks the height of a shop." He guessed there must be about forty dead.
List Of Injured.
The seriously injured are:
A. COMPAGNOLA, jaw broken.
MRS. A. CLEMPSON, leg broken.
JOHN DAVIE, probably internally injured.
H. DUPUIS, head cut.
MIKE MILLER, leg badly cut.
A. J. HUGHES, head cut.
C. McGRATH, lower limbs injured.
JOE PARNARK, teeth knocked out.
F. W. PARK, back hurt.
Slightly Injured.
W. ANDIATTA; W. MARCHINE; MIKE BORICH; R. BASO; BERT C. COMPANOLA; JIM DUGGAN; J. EMERY; C. F. MORSE; T. MccGUICKIE; R. PERRY; J. ROBERTSON; T. TONESAMA.
Dead Bodies Recovered.
P. BURNS, St. Louis.
S. DUGGAN, Ireland.
A. DUPUIS, Vancouver.
H. HALLIGAN, Britannia Beach.
W. MORLEY, Vancouver.
J. McKUNE, Britannia Beach.
J. NEWPOSE, Lancaster, Eng.
J. STUART, Scotland.
F. WALL, Britannia Beach.
G. P. MARSHALL, Vancouver.
D. G. McLEOD, Vancouver.
JOHN DUGGAN, Ireland.
MRS. APPLETON and two children, Britannia Beach.
WM. STAMP, Vancouver.
M. O. HARA, Japan.
S. KAWASAKI, Japan.
Missing.
MIKE BOLVA, Britannia Beach.
JOHN BORICK, Britannia Beach.
MIKE BRADICH, Britannia Beach.
A. C. LEMPSON, and three children, Vancouver.
W. F. CLAQUE, Lancaster, Eng.
JOHN DUGGAN, Britannia Beach.
MIKE GASCO, Britannia Beach.
M. LATICA, Britannia Beach.
CAREL MARSEN, Quesmelle.
J. MARTIN, Vancouver.
JOHN OLSEN, Vancouver.
JOHN PAVELICH, Vancouver.
PETER PONARK, Vancouver.
ELIS SMILGEMICK, Vancouver.
M. SULLECK, Vancouver.
GEORGE STARR, Vancouver.
JOHN SOBOL, Vancouver.
MRS. THOMAS McCULLA and daughter, Seattle.
C. COPELAND, Los Angeles and wife, of Seattle.
P. LEPAGE, Vancouver.
J. B. McINTOSH, Greenwood.
GEORGE NEAP, London, Eng.
J. McGILLIVRAY, Nova Scotia.
A. L. STARKEY, and wife, London, Eng.
C. H. DAINTON, Britannia Beach.
S. KAWASGUCHI, Japan.
The following cook house employees are also missing:
A. EVANS.
R. GORMAN.
A. COMBS.
R. BOULD.
FRANK FRIET.
W. COX.
GEORGE LEYS.
F. FOWLER.
Houses Swept Away.
The slide swept away a bunk house containing 15 men, a cook house containing 10 men, and several private houses in which were a number of women and children. Several men who were going off the night shift at midnight were also killed.
At last reports rescuers were working on the pile of debris, but few bodies had been found. Fifteen of the injured were being brought to Vancouver tonight by steamer.
Owing to lack of communication with Howe Sound except by steamer, details are not yet available.

Winnipeg Free Pass Manitoba 1915-03-24

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FIFTY-SIX KILLED IN MINE CAMP DISASTER.

MANY VICTIMS BURIED AS THEY SLEPT BY AVALANCHE OF SNOW AND DEBRIS.

Vancouver, B.C., March 23. -- Fifty-six dead and twenty-two injured was the latest official statement made today of casualties in the avalanche disaster early Sunday at the miners' camp at the Britannia Mines, Limited, on Howe Sound, 25 miles north of Vancouver.
Loosened by melting snow, parts of the mountain side far above the mine level gave way, and snow and rock crashed on to the buildings of the camp, burying many of the victims as they slept.
Among the dead are C. E. COPELAND, engineer of the copper and silver mine, and his wife, of Seattle. One other woman, wife of a miner, and her two children and three children of another family are known to have been killed.
It was not only a snowslide but a landslide, similar to that which wiped out a large section of the town of Frank in the Crow's Nest Pass some years ago. A slice of a mountain at the side of the little mining village came away and it was thia that covered the wreckage of buildings in many feet deep in rocks and snow. Monday afternoon a second but smaller slide occurred and the miners are now working with one eye on the mountainside hanging above them, expecting any time to hear another avalanche.
Pathetic Stories.
The first news of the disaster was registered away by the racing of generators when the load went off by the carrying away of the mine buildings' machinery at three minutes after midnight Sunday. Knowing something was wrong, officials at the beach immediately started for the mine. Half way they met several terrified Japanese, who were running for their lives. Then they encountered the first edge of the slide, a mile and a half from the mine. Soon they found a man who had been carried down, and who was so little hurt that he was able to give a confused account of what happened.
Many terribly pathetic cases marked the death list. MRS. APPLETON and her two children, one born only a few days before, were killed, while her husband escaped. The husband, almost demented, was found digging furiously in the place where he thought his home had been located.
Shift Boss T. McCULIA was bruised and bleeding when he came to himself after the slide, and was unable to find the slightest trace of his wife and daughter.
A. CLEMPSON and his three children were killed, but the wife and mother rescued, though badly hurt.
C. E. COPELAND and his young wife, who recently came from Seattle, died together. He was the mine engineer, and recently refused a professorship in an eastern university.

Winnipeg Free Press Manitoba 1915-03-24