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Douglas Island, BC Steamer ISLANDER Disaster, Aug 1901

BRIT COL Steamer Islander Lynn Canal 8-15-1901.jpg

ALASKA STEAMER LOST.

STEAMSHIP "ISLANDER" COLLIDES WITH AN ICEBERG.

SIXTY PEOPLE PERISH.

DISASTER OCCURS OFF DOUGLAS ISLAND AT 2 O'CLOCK A.M. OF THURSDAY LAST -- VESSEL SANK IN TEN MINUTES, CARRYING DOWN FIFTY-FIVE TO SIXTY SOULS, INCLUDING PASSENGERS AND CREW -- BOILERS OF THE SHIP EXPLODE AS THE VESSEL WENT DOWN -- PARTIAL LIST OF THE LOST.

Victoria, B.C., Aug. 18. -- The steamer ISLANDER, the crack passenger steamer of the Alaskan route operated by the Canadian Pacific Navigation company of this city, struck an iceberg off Douglas Island at 2 a.m. on the morning of Thursday last, and went to the bottom, carrying fifty-five to sixty souls, including passengers and members of the crew.

Boilers Exploded.
Some of the survivors arrived here this evening by the steamer "Queen." They report that as the
"ISLANDER" went down her boilers exploded, causing the death of many who might have escaped.
Capt. FOOTE was on the bridge when the vessel struck and stayed there, going down with his steamer. Among the passengers lost on the
"ISLANDER" were:
MRS. ROSS, wife of Gov. James A. Ross of the Yukon territory; her child and niece.
DR. JOHN DUNCAN of Victoria.
W. G. PRESTON and bride of Seattle.
F. MILLS.
W. H. KEATING and two sons of Victoria and Los Angeles, Cal.
J. V. DOUGLAS of Vancouver.
MRS. PHILLIPS and child of Seattle.
MR. BELL.
MRS. CAPT. NICKERSON.
MRS. J. C. HENDERSON of Victoria.
MRS. W. SMITH of Vancouver.
MRS. J. L. WILCOX of Seattle.
J. A. BLETHEN of Vancouver.
Members of Crew Lost:
CAPT. FOOTE.
GEORGE ALLEN, third engineer.
HORACE SMITH, second steward.
S. J. PITTS, cook.
Two Chinese.
BURKHOLDER and BURKE, oilers.
Two firemen.
One coal passer.
Night Salloon watchman KENDALL.
JOE BEARD, second pantryman.
Two waiters.
G. MILLER, barber.
N. LAW, M. P. JOCK, PORTER and MORAN, coal passers.

Financial Loss Heavy.
There was $275,000 in gold on the steamer, $100,000 of which was carried by passengers. H. N. HART, who has spent sixteen years in the Klondike, lost $35,000 in dust.
Some say that CAPT. FOOTE reached a raft, but when he saw the extent of the disaster he jumped overboard.
No accurate list of the lost will be available until the arrival of the purser on the steamer "Farrallon" tomorrow.

Estimate As to Loss of Life.
George McL. Brown, executive agent of the Canadian Pacific railroad, after interviewing the officers and passengers who returned, said: "The purser is remaining in the north attending to the forwarding of through passengers. It is impossible to give an exact list of those lost, but from the fact that 113 were saved, the number lost must be very much below the figures mentioned. In my opinion the loss of life will not exceed twenty."

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article | by Dr. Radut