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Crozier, AZ Passenger Train Wreck, Nov 1892

RAILROAD CATASTROPHE.

PASSENGER TRAIN WRECKED IN TRUXTON CANYON.

The west bound passenger train that should have arrived here Wednesday night at 11:20 was wrecked in the canyon about two miles east of Crozier. The cause of the accident is unknown, but it is supposed that the rails spread and caused the cars to go onto the ties as the train was crossing a long trestle bridge.
Our correspondent visited the scene of the wreck on the Atlantic and Pacific railroad yesterday and found everything in wild confusion, Pullman palace cars standing on end or lying on their sides.
Following is a list of killed and injured:
WM. Y. WALKER, Trenton, Missouri, killed.
ETHEL EVANS, (five years old), Filmore, Kansas, back bruised.
MRS. B. J. SMITH, (colored), Kingman, Arizona, bruised left side and right thigh.
MISS GEORGIA LAKER, Minneapolis, chest bruised.
MISS ETHEL ELDRIDGE, Indianapolis, fracture left leg above ankle.
W. L. RICH, Los Angeles, both legs bruised.
W. R. HIGGIS, Chicago, shoulder sprained.
JOHN LOVENEDGE, Marcelles, Mich., back bruised.
H. F. PRICKET, Rialto, California, left arm bruised.
MRS. JOHN LA DOW, Los Angeles, bruised right shoulder and side.
S. K. MALLOCK, Julien, California, cut left hand, left leg bruised.
The following are slightly injured:
JAMES QUICK, Bradford, Kansas.
H. F. WHITTLER, Los Angeles.
MRS. C. C. WILLIAMS, Mosley, Mo.
MISS LOU BALLINGER, Richmond, Mo.
ALFRED J. PAYNE, Toronto, Canada.
MRS. E. B. LANGTON, Courjon, Colorado.
MISS JENNIE NELSON, Courjon, Colorado.
MRS. C. L. GRIFFIN, Oxford, Kas.
JOHN KILBURN, Worcester, Mass.
OSCAR HART, Keystone, Mo.
Probably never in the history of railroading was there a more fortunate escape from a terrible catastrophe. Both west bound passenger trains were late and were running as sections of the same train. The first section in rounding a sharp curve at the foot of a high cliff, reached out on a wooden bridge that spans Truxton Canyon, and before the first passenger coach got across, something gave way and in a moment more everything was wild confusion, the first coach layon its side just beyond a short rock cut west of the bridge, the first Pullman was derailed in the cut, but could not upset owing to the walls of rock. The remaining two Pullman's were in the bottom of the canyon having gone completely through the bridge, which was smashed to splinters. The two rear Pullmans stood on end in the canyon each resting its upper end against the sides of the canyon forming a 'V'. The second section was only eight minutes behind, and the only train men on board, who could reach the train in the rear were conductor T. J. Homer and F. L. Parks, news agent. Both of these men, with great presence of mind, rushed back to signal the other train and succeeded in stopping it in time to avert a terrible disaster. Drs. Dean and Smith were the first on the scene and under their care all injured passengers were taken to Peach Springs and well cared for. Friday they were transferred past the wreck and continued their journey westward. It will require two days to rebuild the bridge and clear away the wreckage. Dr. Dean informs us that none of the injured passengers are fatally hurt.

Mohave County Miner Arizona 1892-11-17



article | by Dr. Radut